Dear Engaged Bystander, David Lee shared a great blog with us called Richmond Confidential.  It is an interesting view into what is happening in Richmond 4 months after the rape that grabbed the national media's attention (for a week or two...) 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander, On October 25, “as many as 20 people were involved in or stood and watched the gang rape of a 15 year old girl outside a California high school homecoming dance...” 

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Dear Engaged Bystander,  I want to highlight an example each week of a bystander taking action.  These can be multiple interventions or a small action that is not even noticed.  In the media, we do hear of the larger than life situations.  
 

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From the Office on Victims of Crime:
 

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I spend so much of my time talking about various online events for continuing education that I sometimes forget 1.) that some people still have money to actually go to trainings and conferences; and 2.) that there's really no substitute for the networking and collegial interaction that goes on at trainings and conferences. For those of you looking at spending some budget funds on live events, March and April are traditionally packed with good stuff, and this year's no exception, no matter what region you're in:

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Dear Engaged Bystander, I think that one of the biggest mistakes human service/advocacy programs make is in believing that if you give someone enough information, it will change their behaviors. I have a lot of great information about exercise and eating right, yet I sit at my computer for hours with chocolate at my side… 
 
So if information alone is not enough, what are the factors that encourage a bystander to take action?
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  In case you did not hear, Prevent Connect will be holding two online reading clubs based upon the NSVRC publication "Engaging Bystanders in Sexual Violence Prevention."  (See announcement below.)  What is great about this online event is that it will give you a sense of how this book can be used by book groups throughout your community.  I used it in my own book group and was amazed by the stories I heard from women I have known for years.  I encourage

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Dear Engaged Bystander, There is a lot one can do about this day.  Eating chocolate for sure.  But remember that being an engaged bystander means reinforcing the positive as much as intervening when behaviors have gone bad.  So for this day, 1) talk with someone you love about healthy relationships, 2) take a moment to help out someone you don't know, or 3) read about Eve Ensler's new book and video about the life, passions and feelings of girls from around the world.  Click here to see the video.  And the book description is below.  
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander,  The most rewarding project I have ever done in my real world work (e.g., not online) is to create a series of public dialogues across Vermont about sexual violence. We brought together survivors, offenders (who had successfully completed treatment), and family members in a panel discussion about prevention. In a community setting, it was incredibly powerful and profound to break the silence surrounding sexual abuse through respectful public conversations. 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander,  if you have not seen this, NSVRC has been able to offer a discount on films with the Media Education Foundation.  They prodce some very interesting films and in particular, you may want to look at their newest film, The Line.   See the full description below. 
warmly
joan
 
The Line Campaign Description:
A one night stand far from home goes terribly wrong. As the filmmaker unravels her experience, she decides to confront her attacker.

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