Being mindful and intentional: Some helpful tools for the journey

This week we have a guest preventionista! Liz Zadnik shares her perspectives on how to approach prevention work in a way that creates lasting, sustainable, and meaningful change.

For me, prevention is a balance of action AND intention. Without mindful intention, actions can go astray pretty quickly. In addition to being a preventionista, my life journey continues to build my identity as a white anti-racist and ally to people who identify as LGBTQ. This work, both personal and professional, has helped me see prevention as process, not product.  How can the organization I work for promote equity, inclusion, and unity? How can my decisions, as small as they may be, bring about change?  Can I challenge business-as-usual with a question or change of direction? How can the project I’m working on promote equity?

The Applied Research Center, a resource I refer to often, has some great tools in this area. Their Racial Equity Impact Assessment offers some planning questions and topics for consideration when organizations are engaging in community partnerships and project management. This tool, and others like it, can help identify ways to make equity central to the decision-making process. In addition to an institutional approach, I can also ask myself where I can take action. Where and when do I have some level of control? How can I advance social justice?

Being intentional can be as powerful as being active; sometimes more so. Having guides or mentors for intentionality is a must – we can’t coach ourselves when it comes to some things. Where do you strive to be intentional?  Is it ending sexism? Supporting the rights of people who identify as LGBTQ? Working to promote or change policy? What tools, people, or questions do you find helpful in this process?


Who am I?
Liz Zadnik, Education & Resource Coordinator for the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape. I’ve been with PCAR for almost three years now, but I’ve worked in violence prevention and reproductive justice for close to six. I’m stoked to be a guest blogger for Preventionista – I hope my thoughts and perspectives can start some productive conversations.

Comments

Submitted by lpalumbo on

This is a really great reminder that a little bit of mindfulness goes along way! I love the concept that intentionality is activism. Thoughts are powerful!

Submitted by amperrotto on

In some ways, I think that getting to thoughts is even deeper than outright actions. Thoughts are at least internal, and one step closer to feelings. This makes us one step closer to changing the way we think. Deep stuff!

Submitted by slaskey on

Thank you so much for this post.  I think intentionality is critical and is about being active and present!