So many of you have expressed frustration at trying to maintain clinical competency for you and your staff. With budget cuts and staffing constraints, traveling to conferences and courses can be a challenge. Providing our own clinical education is not only possible, though, it can be easy, low-tech and free. Over at the forensic healthcare blog today, you'll find a clinical guide I put together on STIs.

Undefined

Many people are creating their own trainings as a way to add staff and/or maintain team competency. If you're looking to implement your own educational programs (or just want to fine tune the ones you already have running), consider checking out the National Victim Assistance Academy's guide, The Ultimate Educator (OVC) and its fantastic chapter on Adult Learning (PDF).

Undefined

Over at the Forensic Healthcare site, Jennifer Pierce Weeks, current IAFN president, has a great guest post on evaluating SANE trainers. If you are responsible for finding someone to train your staff or are contemplating hosting a training in the future, Jen has some great tips on what to consider to make sure you get quality training without necessarily bankrupting your program in the process.

Undefined

Last week, in a comment on my post on the STI Clinical Guide, Kim mentioned the live courses taught by the CDC through the National Network of HIV/STD Prevention Training Centers. Aside from the 5-day course, there is also a 3-day course (which still includes clinical) available. You can check course availability and scheduling here.

Undefined

Just a reminder that we still have a handful of spots available for the leadership and management workshop we will be doing at IAFN in Atlanta this year. The workshop will be all day on Saturday, Oct. 24th. If you have any interest in attending, please register soon. Among the topics we will be covering:

Undefined

First off, apologies for the paucity of posts as of late. I am smack in the middle of a 12 city/8 week tour of the US (because March and April are incredibly busy training months), and I simply haven't been able to keep up. This week is relatively quiet with only an overnighter for me tonight, so I hope to get more content up than I have over the past 2 weeks.
 

Undefined

For those of you who will be attending the IAFN Annual Scientific Assembly, please note that we will be doing a full-day workshop on Saturday, October 24th for program managers (for some reason, they titled it NSVRC Leadership, which doesn't provide much info). The goal of the workshop is to provide program managers with tools and resources to more efficiently and effectively run sustainable clinical programs.

Undefined

The International Association of Forensic Nurses is one of the best means of support for SANE program managers and their staff. If you are not yet a member, I really encourage you to join. Access to the SANE listserv, On the Edge, the Journal of Forensic Nursing and other member benefits can provide additional resources for any program. And I couldn't be more happy about the commitment IAFN has made to online continuing education.

Undefined

One of the things I do in my spare time (*snicker*) is maintain a forensic healthcare blog. Although it's not connected to any specific project, it has quite a bit of content related to maintaining sexual assault medical forensic exam clinical competency. Mind you, it's not only sexual assault content on that site; you'll find all apsects of clinical forensic healthcare, from program management to interpersonal violence to policy and research.

Undefined

For those of you trying to get more SANEs trained, but unable to access a training in your area, or unable to afford to pay for nurses to travel, Duquesne is having an online SANE course beginning September 14th. Cost is $595, but IAFN members get a $50 discount. There are also group rates available. The course is entirely virtual, so there's no requirement to spend any time at Duquesne.
 
You can check out the information about the course here.

Undefined

Pages

Subscribe to Continuing Education