Anthony Tjan has a great post today about keeping employees happy. It's something we talk about all the time, since we know people aren't always paid what they deserve, and we know the hours people give to call are often ridiculous. And yet, there are some programs that have very little turnover, and it's not necessarily because they have more money than everyone else.
 

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Here's an interesting idea: boomerange recruitment. It's essentially the concept of targeting former employees (high-performing ones) to bring back into the organization. After all, these are people with a proven track record, who know the organization and many (if not all) of its leaders.
 

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A lot of people have asked me about how social media can be used to benefit SANE and other victim service programs. People feel very intimidated by the process, which is a shame, because I think it's an incredibly approachable and democratic tool. And I think we could harness its broad appeal and reach to allow for not just awareness and fundraising campaigns, but also recruitment efforts. If anyone's using social media to help with recruitment I'd love to hear from you!
 

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I will be presenting on sustainability here at EVAW this morning, and one of the areas of focus will be the nexus of nursing leadership and staff retention. I've always said that when looking for guidance for effective recruiting, a lot of the nursing literature isn't relevant, because the role of SANE has so many elements of volunteerism (both figuratively and literally) that the nonprofit literature's often a better fit. However, when it comes to retention, the nursing literature's right on the money.

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I am thrilled to finally have a bit of bandwidth at my disposal now that I am laying over in the Amsterdam airport. So just a quickie for you before my flight boards for Washington--this from our colleagues in the EMS community. EMS Magazine had an article on employee retention in their October 2007 edition (updated in July 2008), and I thought it was interesting how many of their suggestions apply to us, as well.

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Good morning from beautiful Newport, RI!
 

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Here's a practical concept for all of you managers: managing up. It's the idea of positioning people so as to accentuate the positive. You can manage up your boss, your staff and even your organization. When you think about how managing up creates an environment where people feel valued and respected, the sustainability implications become pretty clear: easier to recruit, easier to retain.
 

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I often find articles about recruiting and retaining nurses to be irrelevant to our work, because they generally miss the major issues we face. However, I just read this article from Hospital & Health Networks, and I think it makes some excellent points. I especially like their 9 Principles to Foster Staff Retention:
 

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Trust me when I tell you that this will be the 1st of many conversations we're going to have about recruitment here at the Sustainability blog. Although I wouldn't call myself an expert on the subject, I would say that I have learned quite a bit in the 2 years since this project was born. One of the most important thing I have learned is this: all the literature out there on nursing recruitment (and retention, for that matter), really doesn't apply. For relevant information you need to look to the volunteer literature.
 

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We've talked about rehiring quality SANEs who've left the program as one effective recruitment tool in a previous post, but there's a great Conversation Starter this week that touches on the same topic. Keep in mind, it was written for the business world, but the principles are still applicable...
 

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