About our Blogger:  Jenifer Markowitz is a forensic nursing consultant who specializes in issues related to sexual assault and domestic violence, including medical-forensic examinations and professional education and curriculum development. In addition to teaching at workshops and conferences around the world, she provides expert testimony, case consultation, and technical assistance; and develops training materials, resources, and publications. Much of her work can be found on her website, Forensic Healthcare Online, a space dedicated to helping forensic clinicians access current science and clinical guidance.

Blog Description: This blog mines the vast online world of nonprofit and healthcare management, public policy and forensic education information to bring you accessible (and usually free) resources to keep your SANE programs healthy.

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I spend so much of my time talking about various online events for continuing education that I sometimes forget 1.) that some people still have money to actually go to trainings and conferences; and 2.) that there's really no substitute for the networking and collegial interaction that goes on at trainings and conferences. For those of you looking at spending some budget funds on live events, March and April are traditionally packed with good stuff, and this year's no exception, no matter what region you're in:

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Over at RWJF's Future of Nursing blog, Dean Marla Salmon, from the University of Washington School of Nursing poses the question, what do we need to teach the nurse of tomorrow? This is a pretty important question, and one we have discussed frequently here at the sustainability project.

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Here's a practical concept for all of you managers: managing up. It's the idea of positioning people so as to accentuate the positive. You can manage up your boss, your staff and even your organization. When you think about how managing up creates an environment where people feel valued and respected, the sustainability implications become pretty clear: easier to recruit, easier to retain.
 

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Many of you are probably working on some aspect of grant writing and/or fundraising right now. I know I am. So I was really interested in this short article published over at Network for Good on 6 words every nonprofit should avoid. I'm not going to say a lot about it, since it's a pretty self-explanatory piece, except this: all 6 words show up (often) in my most recent grant application.
 
Damn.
 

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Forensic nurse examiners are by and large late adopters when it comes to technology. While it's fantastic to see so many of you creating pages and posting regularly on Facebook, there's still some untapped potential for spreading information in a far simpler and quicker manner: Twitter.
 

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I am a hothead. Anyone reading this who knows me is smiling and nodding right now, because they know my default setting is holler. So I was intrigued by this post over at The Happiness Project last week about under-reacting to problems. That's not to say the post's author advocates ignoring or minimizing problems; simply that as she points out, not every problem requires a full-bore freakout.

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An issue that often comes up when we discuss SANE program sustainability is getting away from the "any warm body" method of staffing. Really looking instead at competencies and clear communication between program managers and prospective SANEs about the expectations and requirements of the role, so that both parties go into the relationship with open eyes. (You'd be stunned at how many people have told me that they've downplayed the realities of the job for fear of scaring new staff members away--bad strategy, by the way.) 
 

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 PBS began airing a new series this month, This Emotional Life. I have not watched it yet (having just heard about it this morning), but I have spent the last hour combing through their website, and I have to say, it's a treasure trove of great information. Not only does the series clearly deal with relevant issues such as trauma, resiliency, etc., but the site provides a host of resources addressing those issues.

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We've been talking a lot this week about what good leadership looks like. I would suggest that good leadership requires a certain amount of kind (as opposed to nice). Several years ago Susan Cramm wrote about compassionate leadership over at the HBR blog, which I think takes us to a similar place.

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