About our Blogger:  Jenifer Markowitz is a forensic nursing consultant who specializes in issues related to sexual assault and domestic violence, including medical-forensic examinations and professional education and curriculum development. In addition to teaching at workshops and conferences around the world, she provides expert testimony, case consultation, and technical assistance; and develops training materials, resources, and publications. Much of her work can be found on her website, Forensic Healthcare Online, a space dedicated to helping forensic clinicians access current science and clinical guidance.

Blog Description: This blog mines the vast online world of nonprofit and healthcare management, public policy and forensic education information to bring you accessible (and usually free) resources to keep your SANE programs healthy.

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I am a hothead. Anyone reading this who knows me is smiling and nodding right now, because they know my default setting is holler. So I was intrigued by this post over at The Happiness Project last week about under-reacting to problems. That's not to say the post's author advocates ignoring or minimizing problems; simply that as she points out, not every problem requires a full-bore freakout.

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An issue that often comes up when we discuss SANE program sustainability is getting away from the "any warm body" method of staffing. Really looking instead at competencies and clear communication between program managers and prospective SANEs about the expectations and requirements of the role, so that both parties go into the relationship with open eyes. (You'd be stunned at how many people have told me that they've downplayed the realities of the job for fear of scaring new staff members away--bad strategy, by the way.) 
 

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 PBS began airing a new series this month, This Emotional Life. I have not watched it yet (having just heard about it this morning), but I have spent the last hour combing through their website, and I have to say, it's a treasure trove of great information. Not only does the series clearly deal with relevant issues such as trauma, resiliency, etc., but the site provides a host of resources addressing those issues.

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We've been talking a lot this week about what good leadership looks like. I would suggest that good leadership requires a certain amount of kind (as opposed to nice). Several years ago Susan Cramm wrote about compassionate leadership over at the HBR blog, which I think takes us to a similar place.

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 I love this sign posted about meeting rules, over at Blue Avocado today:
 

 
"Don't yuck someone's yum"! Outstanding!
 
[Ground Rules for the New Generation, Blue Avocado]

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Happy 2010! I thought I'd start the year off with a positive spin, a new free eBook from Seth Godin. It's called What Matters Now (PDF), and I love the way it was created--multiple short essays and other pieces from great minds in diverse fields. It's sort of an anti-resolution manifesto. Less "try", more "do". A great guide for how we might approach the new year.
 

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I hope everyone is having a happy and peaceful holiday season. In the spirit of the impending new year and the resolutions that go with it, I'd like to turn your attention to a piece I missed earlier this fall. David Brooks, in the NY Times, mentioned this article as one of his favorites of the year: If Air Travel Worked Like Health Care, by Jonathan Rauch (National Journal).

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I like short, useful pieces on managing programs. You know that if you read this site with any frequency. But this one might just be in my top 10. A virtual strategy session for running a program in a tough economy. The author's tips are incredibly relevant to our work. I especially love #3: do less with less. Fantastic.
 

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The Nonprofit Risk Management Center has announced their 2010 webinar schedule. There's some interesting stuff on the list. If you're looking at risk management issues in your own program, you might want to consider the expenditure ($59) to attend one of their offerings. Some of the ones that caught my eye include:

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Over at the Get Rich Slowly blog, there's a fascinating post about negotiating. It really made me think about how often we have to negotiate for ourselves in our line of work: negotiate the ability to conduct these exams, to get paid to coordinate our programs, to work without undue pressures from key stakeholders such as law enforcement and prosecutors, to attract new talent and keep veterans on the roster.

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