Both the Sharper and Rice stories raise a blaring question: At what point do the NFL and Commissioner Roger Goodell confront the constant, haunting league-wide presence of violence against women?

 

To read the full commentary piece, visit this link at the Nation.

NOTE: This commentary piece contains disturbing content that may be triggering for some readers.

 

By Dylan Farrow

 

Amy Farrell is an expert who studies sex trafficking laws. She tells NPR's Arun Rath some states are trying to fix the problem through what are called safe harbor laws.

Twelve states have passed safe harbor legislation for child victims of sex trafficking, according to Farrell. She says the basic premise of these laws is to give law enforcement and prosecutors a way to divert children who have been prostituted from a juvenile delinquent proceeding and instead put them into what's called a "child in need" proceeding.

 

by Marianne Møllmann, Amnesty International

Each year around March 8 (International Women’s Day), representatives of world governments come together to draw up a statement that is supposed to communicate the notion that women and men are equal. This has been a key tenet of international relations since the signing of the United Nations Charter in 1945, so one would think it would not be terribly controversial.

One would be wrong.

By Jeff Anderson

Jeff Anderson is an attorney and the founder of Jeff Anderson and Associates in St. Paul, Minnesota. He has represented survivors of sexual abuse by clergy and other authority figures for 28 years.

(CNN) -- As Pope Benedict XVI steps down, the moral authority and future of the Roman Catholic Church depends on the next pope forcefully dealing with child sex abuse in its ranks.

All Natasha S. Alexenko wanted to do after she was raped at gunpoint by an unknown assailant in 1993 was take a shower. But feeling a responsibility to help police solve the crime, she submitted to an exhaustive four-hour physical exam. Never did she imagine that the rape kit — the physical evidence — would sit on a shelf in a police property room for more than nine years. Eventually the rape kit was processed and her attacker imprisoned, but hundreds of thousands of rape kits are thought to be languishing in crime storage facilities across the country.

 

By Christine "Cissy" White

“The big question is, ‘Why didn’t they leave earlier?’” I heard Elizabeth Vargas ask on the morning news last week, not even 24 hours after the country learned that three women were free after a decade of captivity.

I could feel the heat under my skin making my neck red and my face blotchy. “So many asking that,” replied David Muir, further wondering, “Was there never another chance to escape?” before beginning a report about kidnap victims.

By Frida Ghitis

By Mary Dispenza

(CNN) -- Finally. Finally. Finally, a strong important voice in the world, the United Nations, speaks out on behalf of the rights of children and condemns the Vatican and the bishops for crimes of violence, rape and sexual abuse against children by transferring pedophile priests from parish to parish, withholding documents for prosecution and perpetuating an institutional culture of secrecy and shame.

By Diana Reese

Where were the parents?

This is the question that’s bothered me since hearing about Steubenville, Rehtaeh Parsons in Canada and now Audrie Pott.

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