All Natasha S. Alexenko wanted to do after she was raped at gunpoint by an unknown assailant in 1993 was take a shower. But feeling a responsibility to help police solve the crime, she submitted to an exhaustive four-hour physical exam. Never did she imagine that the rape kit — the physical evidence — would sit on a shelf in a police property room for more than nine years. Eventually the rape kit was processed and her attacker imprisoned, but hundreds of thousands of rape kits are thought to be languishing in crime storage facilities across the country.

 

On a recent day at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, inmates in jumpsuits peek out of their cells to see three men with clipboards walk into the housing unit. These men are auditors doing a practice inspection. They're here to see if the facility complies with a federal law called the , or PREA.

 

To read full article, visit this NPR link.

Today, the Center for American Progress released a new analysis that examines "How the Prison Rape Elimination Act Helps LGBT Immigrants in Detention." The brief, by CAP Policy Analyst Sharita Gruberg, details the risks that LGBT immigrants face in the U.S. detention system, why these standards are so vital for protecting immigrants, and why we still need to go further with reforming these standards.

 

Pennsylvania's top court on Wednesday rejected a bid by former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky to appeal his 2012 conviction on charges of sexually abusing children.

 

To read full article, visit this Reuters link.

There are few statistics more jarring than this one: According to a survey released late last week, 65.1 percent of Brazilians think that if a woman is “dressed provocatively,” she deserves to be “attacked and raped.” Here’s another one: 59 percent of the 3,810 respondents across 212 cities said that if a Brazilian woman “knew how to behave,” there would be fewer rapes.

 

By Anonymous

A new study has found that 43 percent of teenage boys and young college men are coerced into unwanted sex or sexual behavior.

 

To read full article, visit this CBS St. Louis link.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 150,000 to 200,000 girls in the U.S. are at risk of being forced to undergo cutting. The CDC says “at risk” because there are no actual records of the practice, only estimates – and old estimates at that. Its latest data date to 1997, the year after it was banned in the U.S.

But citing anecdotal evidence from health professionals and frontline workers, experts who work with victims and their communities say FGM is on the rise.

 

Thousands of women and girls around the world are subjected to forced marriages, mutilation, attacks and even murder — all in the name of maintaining the "honor" of the perpetrator, family or community that condones it. Honor Diaries features nine women's rights advocates with connections to Muslim-majority societies, and also lends support and encourages sponsorship and promotion of the International Violence Against Women Act.

 

NEW YORK — A human trafficking survivor joined U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) Saturday to advocate for a bill that would send the IRS after pimps and traffickers for tax evasion, and provide aid and protection to survivors.

 

To read original article, visit this CBS New York link.

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