This Occasional Paper is entitled Beijing and Beyond: Putting Gender Economics at the Forefront, Fifteen Years After the World Conference on Women. This paper demonstrates that, notwithstanding some advances since the Beijing Conference and the adoption of CEDAW, the UN member States still have not fully implemented their commitments to gender equity as an essential condition for sustainable economic and social development. Also, the evolution of the gender statistical indicators, along with the narratives included in this publication, prove that that there is an evident gap between gender legislation and its implementation of actual policies.

Furthermore, the GEI uncovers a staggering wipe out of the economic gains made by women at the global level and the negative impact of the global financial crisis on them. These commentaries draw attention most specifically to the financial crisis as its effects are widespread and exacerbate already existing inequalities. They also highlight the gendered nature of the crisis and its effects on women and women-depending economies. Moreover, the articles point to concrete policies that which should be implemented to deal with the current crises.

Para ver el informe en Español haga click aqui.
Gender Equity Index 2009 (GEI)

Violence and abuse occur in all age groups, at all socioeconomic levels, and throughout all of society’s structure. This paper reviews a sampling of the literature that supports the contention that violence and abuse lead to a significant increase in health care utilization and costs. Includes a graph that illustrates the conditions and health risk behaviors that are known or suspected to have a correlation with lifetime exposure to abuse.

Hidden Costs in Health Care: The Economic Impact of Violence and Abuse

This report documents women’s experiences of harassment, financial control, control over their course and institution choices, stalking, violence, and sexual assault.

This document provides highlights from the first phase of a collaborative research project between the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) and the FrameWorks Institute to study current perceptions held by the United States public regarding sexual violence. Highlights Phase 1 (PDF) Highlights Phase 1 (text) Read Full Report   Read more about the partnership between NSVRC and Frameworks Institute.

This document, written by Hallie Martynuik, provides infomation on steps to created an institution based SART as well as lessons learned.

 

The focus of this abridged book is on males who are raped by other males. Although there are rare instances of female perpetrators and male victims, the vast majority of cases of male rape involve males assaulting other males. This abridged book outlines the most important things you should know when confronted with an incident of male rape. In order to know what you should and should not do, it is critically important to first understand what male rape is all about. It is also important to consider the similarities and the unique implications of male rape as compared to female rape in this culture.
If He is Raped: A Guidebook for Parents, Partners, Spouses, and Friends

Immigrant Women and Sexual Violence highlights the common experiences of immigrant women who are victims of sexual violence, the legal protections and public benefits available, and practices and suggestions for increasing the effectiveness of services provided to immigrant women.
Immigrant Women and Sexual Violence

This document explores reasons for the systemic omission of women with disabilities from mainstream research and from services addressing non-disabled women's experiences. The article includes a discussion about inequity, predominant values and culture, use of language, disabled women's experiences of oppression and violence, and service provision within the context of feminist standpoint theory.
Individual-Systemic Violence: Disabled Women's Standpoint

This review evaluates how parenting programs succeed at: 1) eliminating child abuse as manifest in official reports and in-person assessments; 2) altering parenting behaviors or attitudes associated with abuse; 3) enhancing parent-child relationships and positive parenting skills as buffers against abuse.

Documents available include:

Full review: A Systematic Review of Parenting Interventions to Prevention Child Abuse Tested with RCT Designs in High Income Countries.

Briefing Paper: A Systematic Review of Parenting Interventions to Prevention Child Abuse Tested with RCT Designs in High Income Countries.

Briefing Paper: Modifying Gender Role Stereotypes in Children.

Juveniles commit a significant portion of the sex offenses that occur in the United States each year. They account for up to one-fifth of rapes and one-half of all cases of child molestation committed annually. In a 2000 study, data collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 23 percent of sexual assault offenders were under the age of 18. Boys ages 13 to 17 perpetrate most of the sexual crimes committed by juveniles, but recent studies have shown that girls under age 18 and children under age 13 have also committed sexual offenses. Across the country, police officials partnering with other stakeholders have implemented successful programs to manage offenders and prevent future sexual offending by juveniles. This brief describes trends observed in the field and the strategies employed by two law enforcement agencies to manage juvenile sex offenders in their communities.
Juvenile Sex Offenders: Managing and Preventing Future Offenses

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