The following page gives an overview of male rape. It also talks about male rape as an act of anti-gay violence and what to do if you are a victim. It also includes references and a bibliography for further information.
Male Rape

 

Violence and abuse occur in all age groups, at all socioeconomic levels, and throughout all of society’s structure. This paper reviews a sampling of the literature that supports the contention that violence and abuse lead to a significant increase in health care utilization and costs. Includes a graph that illustrates the conditions and health risk behaviors that are known or suspected to have a correlation with lifetime exposure to abuse.

Hidden Costs in Health Care: The Economic Impact of Violence and Abuse

An interview with Deirdre Keys, Coordinator of the Stalking Response Program at the Battered Woman’s Legal Advocacy Project, a state-wide agency supporting advocacy in Minnesota, and formally of Cornerstone Advocacy Service, Bloomington, Minnesota, highlighting promising responses to stalking.Practitioner Perspectives: Highlighting Promising Responses to Stalking Across the United States

Research on juvenile sex offenders goes back more than half a century; however, little information about these young offenders and their offenses exists. This Bulletin draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide population-based epidemiological information on juvenile sex offending.

It is OJJDP’s hope that the findings reported in this Bulletin and their implications will help inform the policy and practice of those committed to addressing the sexual victimization of youth and strengthening its preven-tion and deterrence—considerations that are critical to success.

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors
 
 

Juveniles commit a significant portion of the sex offenses that occur in the United States each year. They account for up to one-fifth of rapes and one-half of all cases of child molestation committed annually. In a 2000 study, data collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 23 percent of sexual assault offenders were under the age of 18. Boys ages 13 to 17 perpetrate most of the sexual crimes committed by juveniles, but recent studies have shown that girls under age 18 and children under age 13 have also committed sexual offenses. Across the country, police officials partnering with other stakeholders have implemented successful programs to manage offenders and prevent future sexual offending by juveniles. This brief describes trends observed in the field and the strategies employed by two law enforcement agencies to manage juvenile sex offenders in their communities.
Juvenile Sex Offenders: Managing and Preventing Future Offenses

The majority of teens have been involved in a romantic relationship. The following  brief, Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships, summarizes findings from focus groups that explored what teens themselves have to say about these relationships.  
 
Among the findings:- Teens view respect, trust, and love as essential to healthy relationships.- Teens have a clear understanding and expectation of what defines a healthy romantic relationship.- Teens' relationships typically fall short of their own standards of healthy romantic relationships.- Infidelity, relationship violence, and few role models contribute to teens' low expectations for healthy relationships. Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships

The purpose of this project was to determine whether adult sexual assault cases in a Midwestern community were more likely to be investigated and prosecuted after the implementation of a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program, and to identify the "critical ingredients" that contributed to that increase. The authors found that case progression through the criminal justice system significantly increased pre- to post-SANE, in that more cases reached the "final" stages of prosecution (I.e., conviction at trial and/or guilty plea bargains) post-SANE. The findings of study indicated that the SANE program has been instrumental in the creation of more complete, fully corroborated cases.  A step-by-step toolkit for evaluating the work of SANEs in the criminal justice system is also availalble.

Systems Change Analysis of SANE Programs: Identifying the Mediating Mechanisms of Criminal Justice System Impact

The NIJ-funded Survey of was conducted to estimate the number of unsolved criminal cases containing forensic evidence that had not been submitted to crime laboratories for analysis. Of crimes received by U.S. law enforcement agencies during 2007, there were an estimated total of 33,696 unsolved rapes 73% of which had forensic evidence collected.  State and local law enforcement agencies reported an estimated 27,595 unsolved (18%) rapes that had not been submitted to a crime laboratory. The study explores explanations for evidence backlogs and implications for addressing challenges faced by communities.

The 2007 Survey of Law Enforcement Forensic Evidence Processing

This paper explores how youth and violence have been framed in the media, how the issue of race complicates depictions of youth and violence, and how public attitudes about government can inhibit public support for strategies to effectively prevent violence. Commissioned by UNITY/Prevention Institute and written by the Berkeley Media Studies Group, this paper makes recommendations for the next steps in reframing violence among youth.
Moving From Them to Us: Challenges in Reframing Violence Among Youth

This document will introduce readers to primary prevention and to the concepts, terms and models that comprise this approach. It will explore the movement’s history for lessons learned and talk about how the work of preventing sexual violence connects directly and indirectly to the work that each of us in the movement does. Finally, it will help you talk the talk. We will explore the public health model and associated terminology so that you can use it if you need it (e.g., when talking with funders), but it will not be a main focus.

Tools for Change: An Introduction to the Primary Prevention of Sexual Assault

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