This joint Statement is a call to all States, international and national organizations, civil society and communities to uphold the rights of girls and women. It also calls on those bodies and communities to develop, strengthen, and support specific and concrete actions directed towards ending female genital mutilation.
 
Eliminating Female Genital Mutilation: An Interagency Statement

Among the findings of this report was that 1.8 million of the 22.3 million U.S. adolescents (ages 12-17) have been victims of a serious sexual assault.

The Prevalence and Consequences of Child Victimization: Summary of a Research Study

This VAWnet Applied Research document describes current research findings on the effects of childhood and adulthood sexual victimization on women’s mental health.
The Psychological Consequences of Sexual Trauma

This report provides an overview of results from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Two important findings are that "adverse childhood experiences are vastly more common than recognized or acknowledged and have a powerful relation to adult health a half-century later."
The Relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences to Adult Health: Turning Gold Into Lead

This comprehensive report of the Michigan Sexual Assault Systems Response Task Force is built on the work of four multidisciplinary workgroups: the Prevention Education Workgroup, the Survivor Services Workgroup, the Medical System Workgroup and the Criminal Justice System Workgroup. Each group identified barriers to justice and services for survivors of sexual assault, short and long-term remedies to eliminate those barriers and strategies for the implementation of the remedies. The recommendations come in the form of 'best practice recommendations', and 'recommendations'. Best practice recommendations address an improvement or change in policy, protocols and response and recommendations address legislative or fiscal change.
The Response to Sexual Assault: Removing Barriers to Services and Justice

The Tension of Turf builds upon Prevention Institute's initial coalition building paper Developing Effective Coalitions: An Eight Step Guide, which focused on the coalition start-up process. After years of working with coalitions, Prevention Institute has developed the current paper in response to something commonly witnessed within coalitions: turf struggle. Turf is a frequent problem that is often misunderstood. The paper discusses common types of turf struggles, reasons why they occur, and lists a set of recommendations for limiting the negative aspects of turf.
The Tension of Turf: Making it Work for the Coalition

This document provides a historical examination of the first ten years of the Violence Against Women Act, with an emphasis on current gaps in public policy related to sexual violence.
The Violence Against Women Act and Its Impact on Sexual Violence Public Policy: Looking Back and Looking Forward

The YRBSS was developed in 1990 to monitor priority health risk behaviors that contribute markedly to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. These behaviors, often established during childhood and early adolescence, include: Tobacco use, Unhealthy dietary behaviors, Inadequate physical activity, Alcohol and other drug use, Sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection, Behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence.
The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System 2005

"This report, the third of its kind, reviews the progress that has been made in the field of violence prevention since the October 2002 launch of the World report on violence and health and the Global Campaign for Violence Prevention."
Third Milestones of a Global Campaign for Violence Prevention Report 2007

This report presents detailed information about third-party involvement in violent crime. Third parties include bystanders, other victims, household members, police officers, instigators, or any combination of these. Third parties may play a role in the formation and escalation of violence, may intervene to stop an assault, or may be an eyewitness.
 
Third-party Involvement in Violent Crime, 1993-99

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