The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

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This report presents findings from the National Incident-Based Reporting System regarding sexual assault of young children. The data are based on reports from law enforcement agencies of 12 States and covers the years 1991 through 1996. The report presents sexual assault in 4 categories: forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling. Findings include statistics on the incidence of sexual assault, the victims, their offenders, gender, response to these crimes, locality, time of incident, the levels of victim injury, victims' perceptions of offenders' ages, and victim-offender relationships, and other detailed characteristics.
Sexual Assault of Young Children as Reported to Law Enforcement: Victim, Incident, and Offender Characteristics

This study examined the structure and functioning of U.S. SARTs, patterns of SART implementation and how these patterns relate to SARTs perceived effectiveness at improving victim and legal outcomes.

Presents data from the 2008-09 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 195 juvenile confinement facilities between June 2008 and April 2009, with a sample of over 9,000 adjudicated youth. The report provides national-level and facility-level estimates of sexual victimization by type of activity, including youth-on-youth sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also includes an analysis of the experience of sexual victimization, characteristics of youth most at risk to victimization, where the incidents occur, time of day, characteristics of perpetrators, and nature of the injuries. Finally, it includes estimates of the sampling error for selected measures of sexual victimization and summary characteristics of victims and incidents.

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09

Presents data from the 2012 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 326 juvenile confinement facilities between February and September 2012, with a sample of 8,707 adjudicated youth. The report ranks facilities according to the prevalence of sexual victimization, as required under the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-79). The prevalence of victimization, as reported by youth during a personal interview, is based on sexual activity in the 12 months prior to the interview or since admission to the facility, if less than 12 months. This report provides state- and national-level estimates of juvenile sexual victimization by type of activity, including estimates of youth-on-youth nonconsensual sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also explores sexual victimization by the characteristics of both the perpetrator and youth at high risk of victimization, location and time of incidents, and nature of the relationship between youth and facility staff prior to sexual contact.

This Bureau of Justice Statistics report includes results from the second  National Inmate Survey (NIS-2) which includes data from 167 state and federal prisons, 286 jails, and 10 special confinement facilities operated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the U.S. Military, and correctional authorities in Indian country. It was administered to 81,566 inmates ages 18 or older. The report includes information on prevalence, circumstances surrounding victimization, facility rankings and variations based on gender, race, educational background, sexual orientation and previous sexual victimization.  4.4% of prison inmates and 3.1% of jail inmates reported one or more incidents of sexual victimization.

Through this report, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) shares its experience inproviding medical care, counselling and other forms of support to thousandsof victims of sexual violence in many countries around the world. The report is partly born out of outrage about the inexcusable acts that these people have been subjected to and the damage inflicted upon their lives. It demonstrates why it is imperative to make immediate care available, and truly accessible, for those who have been sexually assaulted. MSF hopes that this report will inform and inspire health officials, aid workers and others who should be involved in providing such support.Shattered Lives: Immediate Medical Care Vital for Sexual Violence Victims 

This report  describes the prevalence of sexual violence, rape, and violence against women in public life in Afghanistan and the failure of authorities to protect women's rights.
Silence is Violence :End the Abuse of Women in Afghanistan

This report documents persistent sexual violence by the army, and the limited impact of government and donor efforts to address the problem. The report looks closely at the conduct of the army's 14th brigade as an example of the wider problem of sexual violence by soldiers. The brigade has been implicated in many acts of sexual violence in North and South Kivu provinces, often in the context of massive looting and other attacks on civilians. Despite ample information about the situation, military, political, and judicial authorities have failed to take decisive action to prevent rape.
Soldiers Who Rape, Commanders Who Condone: Sexual Violence and Military Reform in the Democratic Republic of Congo
 

Presents findings on nonfatal stalking victimization in the U.S., based on the largest data collection of such behavior to date. Data were collected in a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW). Topics covered in the report are stalking and harassment prevalence rates by demographic characteristics, offender characteristics, victim-offender relationship, duration of stalking, cyberstalking, protection measures, and emotional impact. The report also includes data on whether victim sought help from others, involvement of a weapon, injuries, other crimes perpetrated by the stalker, and response by the criminal justice system.

Stalking Victimization in the United States

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