The Vera Institute recently released a new guide for organizations that provide sexual violence, domestic violence, and disability services.  This guide seeks to increase avenues for partnership and collaboration between these three types of services, recognizing that people often face co-occurring issues.  The authors of the guide hope to provide background to help meet the needs of women with disabilities, who commonly face sexual and domestic violence, but often do not have access to services that can meet a combination of needs.  This booklet provides information on creating safe, effective, and accessible healing services.

This publication is provided as a starting point for professional organizations and educational institutions to prepare their helping professionals, including doctors, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and beyond, to develop the skills and competencies needed to meet the needs of individuals who may have experienced abuse and violence.

This resource is a two page fact sheet produced by NAESV on the costs and consequences of sexual violence.  It includes a general overview of findings from research on the topic, the cost benefits of early intervention, costs for funding sexual assault services, and cost-effective solutions.

Vice President Biden and Secretary Duncan presented guidelines on legal obligations in addressing sexual violence in school and on campus.  The resources include:

 

Dear Colleague Letter: Sexual Violence (19 p.)

Background, Summary, and Fast Facts Fact Sheet (2 p.)

Know Your Rights Fact Sheet on Title IX and Sexual Violence (2 p.)

A one page fact sheet on the prevention on teen dating violence, intimate partner violence, and sexual violence.  This resource discusses the prevalence of these types of violence as a public health issue that is preventable.  It also discusses some current initiatives and plans for the future.

Link to publication.

This report discusses the value and benefits of rethinking violence prevention.  It suggests an approach that identifies and deconstructs root causes of violence.  Of particular interest in this report is the discussion of the predictability of violence on a community or population wide level.

View the full report.

This toolkit employs art, in various forms, as a universal language and medium for communicating their message about sexual assault prevention and awareness. 

View this toolkit.

The Winter 2010 edition of WCSAP's newsletter focuses on working with LGBTIQ survivors.  Articles focus on creating safe space, interrupting problematic language, and SANE protocol for working individuals who identify as LGBTIQ.

Access: Setting the Stage: Strategies for Supporting LGBTIQ Survivors

This report from Amnesty International notes that sexual violence was widespread in Haiti before January 2010 has been exacerbated by the conditions since the earthquake. The limited assistance the authorities previously  provided has been undermined by the destruction of police stations and court houses. This has made it more difficult to report sexual violence.  Over 50 survivors of sexual violence shared their experiences for the study which highlights how the lack of security and policing in and around the camps is a major factor for the increase in attacks.

Additional Resources

NSVRC Preventing Sexual Violence in Disasters Resource Collection

Haiti's emergency response must include protection from sexual violence (News story, 25 March 2010)
 

Haiti: After the earthquake: Initial mission findings (Briefing, 25 March 2010)

Sexual violence in Haitian camps of the displaced, beyond the numbers (Blog, 22 March 2010)
 

Human rights must be at the core of relief efforts and the reconstruction of Haiti (Public statement, 25 January 2010)

 

This 48-page report includes information from Human Rights Watch on violations of migrants’ rights in 2010 includes coverage of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. Many countries rely on migrant workers to fill labor shortages in low-paying, dangerous, and poorly regulated jobs. Human Rights Watch documented labor exploitation and barriers to redress for migrants in agriculture, domestic work, and construction in Indonesia, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States. Immigration sponsorship systems in many countries give employers immense control over workers and lead to migrants being trapped in abusive situations or unable to pursue redress through the justice system. Sexual abuse of female migrants and trafficking victims has also been documented.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Gender Based Violence