This NIJ Research Report presents findings from a survey of 8,000 U.S. women and 8,000 U.S. men about their experiences as victims of intimate partner violence (rape, physical assault, and stalking). It includes information on same sex and opposite sex violence. Respondents were asked detailed questions about the characteristics and consequences of their victimization during their lifetime and the past 12 months, including the rate of injury among rape and physical assault victims, their use of medical services, and their involvement with the criminal justice system.
 
Extent, Nature and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence

The report, Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence, represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women - both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector's capacity to respond to violence against women.

 

View the infographic.

 

See the full report.

 

 

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.

If your program intends to conduct a needs assessment or program evaluation, you must be aware of federal regulations that protect the privacy and confidentiality of persons involved in research (i.e., human subjects). This guide provides basic information about these federal regulations and explains how they pertain to your needs assessment or program evaluation.

Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

The other three guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
 

These guidelines are meant to serve as an organizing philosophy rather than an irrefutable prescription for prevention work. Due to the enormous amount of resources needed to achieve all of these ideals, it is not realistic that prevention initiatives could "check off" all of the programmatic components contained in these guidelines. Rather, the questions posed by the guidelines are meant to act as benchmarks, facilitating constant improvement in primary prevention program development. It is our hope that this document will help every existing SV/IPV primary prevention program operated at its full capacity, and provide potential programs with information on how to build a foundation for primary prevention work.

Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Sexual Violence & Intimate Partner Violence

SAAM 2012 Healthy Sexuality Guide CoverThis guide provides guidance and practical tools for discussing healthy sexuality within the context of sexual violence for advocates, counselors, prevention educators, and activists. It explores healthy sexuality across the life span and connects this information with a primary prevention tools for local sexual violence programs.

 

 

NCJRS collected and highlighted a list of resources and publications on teen dating violence in honor of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month.  This page provides links to lists of resources and publications.

La tarjeta fue diseñada para profesionales de salud y incluye preguntas potenciales para madres como, "¿Mi pareja me fuerza a hacer cosas sexuales que yo no quiero?" "¿Mi pareja apoya mis decisiones sobre cuándo o si quiero tener más hijos?" y "¿Me siento tan triste que no puedo levantarme de la cama, o cuidar del bebé?" También disponible en inglés.

Housing & Sexual Violence Research Brief Cover with image of doorThis research brief explores the relationship between housing issues, homelessness, and sexual violence. The research reviewed indicates that residents of subsidized housing and people who are homeless experience disproportionate rates of sexual violence.

This brief is part of the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. This packet also includes: the National Survey of Advocates on Sexual Violence, Housing, and the Violence Against Women Act; an overview; a fact sheet; an online resource collection; a technical assistance bulletin; and an advocate's guide to housing and sexual violence.
 
 

 

Safe, affordable, and stable housing can be a protective factor against both sexual violence perpetration and victimization. In 2008, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center partnered with the Victims Rights Law Center, National Sexual Assault Coalition Resource Sharing Project, Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault, University of New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania Community Legal Services to develop and conduct a national survey on housing and sexual violence. The information gained from this study led to the development of several resources to support advocacy at the intersections of housing and sexual violence.

This information packet includes: the National Survey of Advocates on Sexual Violence, Housing, and the Violence Against Women Act; an overview; a fact sheet; an online resource collection; a technical assistance bulletin; a research brief; an infographic; and an advocate's guide to housing and sexual violence.

This publication was developed in the context of the innovative statewide and national approach to IPSV that is emerging from the collaborative work of project partners. First published as an edition of the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs’ quarterly newsletter, Connections (edited by Kathleen Arledge), this compilation of articles represents a wide spectrum of information and practical advice for assessment, intervention, and systems change.

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