The report examines trends in intimate partner violence of persons age 12 or older in the United States.
Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001

This report describes the inconsistencies found in statistical reporting of violence against women, and recommends uniform definitions and data elements for uniformity in reporting.
 
Intimate Partner Violence Surveillance: Uniform Definitions and Recommendations Data Elements

This compilation includes existing tools for assessing intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) victimization in clinical/healthcare settings. The purpose of this compilation is to provide practitioners and clinicians with the most current inventory of assessment tools for determining IPV and/or SV victimization and to inform decisions about which instruments are most appropriate for use with a given population. This document will aid in the selection of assessment instruments to identify victims requiring additional services. This can help practitioners make appropriate referrals for both victims and perpetrators.
 
Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence Victimization Assessment Instruments for Use in Healthcare Settings

This NIJ Research Report presents findings from a survey of 8,000 U.S. women and 8,000 U.S. men about their experiences as victims of intimate partner violence (rape, physical assault, and stalking). It includes information on same sex and opposite sex violence. Respondents were asked detailed questions about the characteristics and consequences of their victimization during their lifetime and the past 12 months, including the rate of injury among rape and physical assault victims, their use of medical services, and their involvement with the criminal justice system.
 
Extent, Nature and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence

This report examines a study conducted to obtain national estimates of the occurrence of IPV-related injuries, to estimate their costs to the health care system, and to recommend strategies to prevent IPV and its consequences.
 
Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States

The articles within this issue illustrate the complexities of IPSV, while painting a picture of a systematic response. By capturing the voices of survivors, advocates and legal leaders in this movement to end violence against women, this Connections will inspire you to look beyond traditional paths of service delivery, dig deeper into the root causes of intimate partner sexual violence,and expand your outreach to survivors. Additionally, it provides a screening resource tool for thought provocation and implementation support.
 
Connections: Intimate Partner Sexual Violence (IPSV)

In April 2007, WHO held an expert meeting on preventing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. WHO produced a background paper for the meeting. The paper explores what can be done to prevent violence against adolescent and adult women that occurs within intimate relationships, and sexual violence that occurs outside intimate relationships.

In a public health framework, primary prevention means reducing the number of new instances of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence by intervening before any violence occurs. Program and research in primary prevention has lagged efforts in secondary and tertiary prevention, which focus on people who are at risk or already have suffered violence. This background paper helps to close that gap and is the basis for a guideline on intimate partner and sexual violence prevention currently being prepared by WHO, CDC, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Primary prevention of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence: Background paper for WHO expert meeting May 2–3, 2007

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