This fact sheet provides information about sexual violence prevention and how health care professionals can assist victims and prevention efforts.

The purpose of this guide is to assist physicians, nurses, and other clinical health care providers in meeting their professional obligations in identifying and providing intervention and treatment to older victims of sexual violence. It includes introductory information, such as definitions and a problem statement, as well as scenarios. Additionally, it discusses issues relevant to health care providers, such as practice recommendations, provider responsibilities, gathering patient history, examination, and evidence collection.

This bookletby the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault (TAASA) includes basic information about the period immediately after the victimization. For example, 'Who can help me?' 'Do I have to tell the police what happened to me?' and 'How will my family and my friends react?'. There are also lists of resources in Texas In Spanish. Ordering information (the PDF is free).

Issue #13 of Strategies In Brief provides a review of research studies on the presence or absence of genital or anal injuries in cases of sexual assault. Absence of injury is relatively common, but this does not necessarily indicate that no assault occurred.

View this In Brief.

This meeting report is an outcome of a consultation held in 2006 on how HIV testing and counselling programmes can take into account and address intimate partner violence and other concerns related to women. The report describes how fear of violence and/or violence affects the uptake of HIV testing and counselling programmes and disclosure of HIV status. It highlights programmes that have addressed violence against women in HIV testing and counselling including through training of counsellors, couple counselling, and addressing HIV/AIDS in services for women experiencing intimate partner violence.
 
Addressing violence against women and HIV testing and counselling: A meeting report

This research report discusses the outcomes of a study conducted to understand the help-seeking patterns of behavior among teens who experienced sexual assault and reported it.  The study found patterns in reporting, including reports that were voluntary, reports that were involuntary, and reports prompted by the circumstances of the assault.  The research suggests that teens who made voluntary reports were more likely to stay enaged in the legal system.

This guide aims to build on those tools and encourage health care providers to conduct full assessments with patients to encourage interventions that provide adequate treatments and recommendations for survivors of sexual violence.

This report discusses the process of obtaining VA disability benefits for the enduring mental health effects of military sexual trauma (MST) and the challenges and discrimination faced by veterans. The report was developed by the Service Women's Action Network (SWAN) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) with assistance by the Yale Law School Veterans Legal Services Clinic.

This publication is provided as a starting point for professional organizations and educational institutions to prepare their helping professionals, including doctors, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and beyond, to develop the skills and competencies needed to meet the needs of individuals who may have experienced abuse and violence.

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