This guide examines the use of polygraph tests and other truth-telling devices (sometimes called “lie-detector tests”) in sexual assault investigations. It is meant to support the Violence Against Women Act and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (VAWA 2005) provision that truth-telling devices must not be used with sexual assault victims as a condition of charging or prosecution of an offense. This guide examines special issues relevant to using truth-telling devices with sexual assault victims. Legislative and judicial actions that have been taken as a result of this debate will also be discussed. Victim advocates, law enforcement officers, and policy makers may use this guide to develop policies, practices, and procedures and to improve collaborations regarding the use of truth-telling devices as the VAWA 2005 provision is adopted across the United States. 

This document provides a historical examination of the first ten years of the Violence Against Women Act, with an emphasis on current gaps in public policy related to sexual violence.
The Violence Against Women Act and Its Impact on Sexual Violence Public Policy: Looking Back and Looking Forward

 The Office for Victims of Crime is pleased to announce the release of the Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report, the first comprehensive assessment of the victim assistance field in nearly 15 years. The Vision 21 initiative gave participants the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of service providers, advocates, criminal justice professionals, allied practitioners, and policymakers to address crime victim issues through a lens broader than their everyday work. The result of this collective examination, the report seeks to permanently transform the way crime victims are treated in this country. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report discusses the following:

  • Major challenges to the integration of research into victim services.
  • The tremendous need for crime victims to have access to legal assistance to address the wide range of legal issues that can arise following victimization.
  • The impact of advances in technology, globalization, and changing demographics on the victim assistance field.
  • The capacity for serving victims in the 21st century and some of the infrastructure issues that must be overcome to reach that capacity.

Furthermore, the final report outlines recommendations for beginning the transformative change, which fall into the following four broad categories:

  • Conducting continuous rather than episodic strategic planning in the victim assistance field to effect real change in research, policy, programming, and capacity building.
  • Supporting research to build a body of evidence-based knowledge and generate, collect, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data on victimization, emerging victimization trends, services and behaviors, and victims’ rights enforcement efforts.
  • Ensuring the statutory, policy, and programmatic flexibility to address enduring and emerging crime victim issues.
  • Building and institutionalizing capacity through an infusion of technology, training, and innovation to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the demands of the 21st century.

The World Health Report, first published in 1995, is WHO's leading publication. Each year the report combines an expert assessment of global health, including statistics relating to all countries, with a focus on a specific subject. The main purpose of the report is to provide countries, donor agencies, international organizations and others with the information they need to help them make policy and funding decisions. This report focuses on primary health care.
The World Health Report 2008 - Primary Health Care: Now More Than Ever

This special collection includes information about 2010 Transportation and Safety Administration (TSA) screening procedures, rights, tips for travelers and information on how to file a complaint for those that feel their rights have been violated.

An evaluation guide from the CDC explains the continuum of evaluating the effectiveness of prevention programs, policies and practices.  Advocates, researchers and policy-makers can use the information in this guide to determine if they are achieving outcomes and making the intended changes.

This Applied Research paper reviews both international and U.S.-based policy efforts to promote sexual abuse prevention and offers considerations for policy development in communities and organizations.

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The cost of crime to victims is an estimated $450 billion a year when factors such as medical costs, lost earnings, pain suffering, and lost quality of life are considered. Rape is the most costly to its victims, totaling $127 billion a year. The average rape or attempted rape costs $5,100 in tangible, out-of-pocket expenses. Medical and mental health care to victims represents the bulk of expenses. Adding to the impact a rape has on the victim's quality of life, the average rape costs $87,000 annually.
Victim Costs and Consequences: A New Look

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