On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

This report outlines the facts surrounding rape and sexual assault and identifies key areas to focus on and improve, including working to change social norms, improving criminal justice response, and protecting students from sexual assault.

Read the report.

Download the fact sheet.

This action plan discusses combating human trafficking and modern-day forms of slavery through government action as well as partnerships with allied professionals and concerned citizens.

Read the plan.

This report describes the successes and challenges of reducing backlogs of DNA evidence in the nation’s crime laboratories and describes some of the solutions that are increasing lab efficiencies. Data was collected from more than 120 public laboratories that receive grants under NIJ’s DNA Backlog Reduction Program.

Learn more.

The 2013 Fall & Winter edition of The Resource includes articles on sexual violence in the military, complete with an interview with Air Force Maj. Gen. Sharon K. G. Dunbar; a youth board from Detroit and what it does to connect with peers; how the profeminist men’s movement was started and what it stands for; Ohio’s push to investigate formerly untested sexual assault kits; and how ancestral teachings are used to form prevention plans in indigenous communities. See what teenagers said when asked, “What are you doing to make your world a safer place?” View the features of the recently released Hollaback! app – then, if you wish, download it free of charge. Learn about how the Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence reacted to headline news cases in its backyard, and see what the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault has done to incorporate prevention evaluation in its work.

Issue #19 of the Strategies in Brief Newsletter discusses the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the collection and use of DNA from violent offenders to help solve cold cases. This decision resolved disagreement between federal and state court systems.

This curriculum addresses the way multidisciplinary audiences write and talk about sexual violence. It provides training on how word choice can make perpetrators seem invisible or minimize the harm caused to the victims.

The NSVRC in collaboration with the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence, the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, and International Association of Forensic Nurses have developed this joint statement recommending that systems be established to ensure that survivors of sexual assault have universal access to medications to prevent HIV following rape.

Read full statement

Read the press release.

Sign on to Support. 

Additional Resources.

The report, Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence, represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women - both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector's capacity to respond to violence against women.

 

View the infographic.

 

See the full report.

 

 

The Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA) is committed to promoting evidence-based practices and high quality research. Consistent with professional and scientific opinion in diverse fields, ATSA recognizes randomized clinical trials (RCT’s) as the preferred method of controlling for bias in treatment outcome evaluations. ATSA promotes the use of RCT to distinguish between interventions that decrease the recidivism risk of sexual offenders and those programs that have no effect or are actually harmful.

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