Increasingly, preventionists are working to prevent sexual violence at community- and societal-levels. Influencing public policies falls within these realms. This resource provides an overview of the key findings from Exploring alcohol policy approaches to prevent sexual violence perpetration, by Caroline Lippy and Sarah DeGue (2014). Potential prevention strategies are discussed, including policy advocacy to influence the availability and marketing of alcohol and the environment surrounding its consumption; anti-oppression, social justice prevention approaches; and collaborations across disciplines, research, and practice.

This position statement from the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence opposes mandatory referral legislation requiring colleges and universities to refer all sexual assault reports to law enforcement.
 

El acceso multilingüe es crucial para la prevención de la violencia sexual y las intervenciones conexas. Esta declaración describe en enfoque del NSVRC al acceso multilingüe dentro de un marco de justicia social.

The Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance offers these recommendations based on more than 30 years of work with students, campuses, community advocates and national leaders dedicated to building an effective response to sexual assault.

This guide discusses the 2014 research article "A systematic review of primary prevention strategies for sexual violence perpetration" by Sarah DeGue et al. It summarizes the methods and discusses key findings of the systematic review. It also proposes ways preventionists can use this research to identify promising prevention strategies, strengthen and evaluate their current efforts, and advocate with funders, policymakers, researchers, and community partners. 

NAESV released this policy statement in response to the recommendations issued by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. In the statement they discuss the continued legislative and administrative focus on partnerships, prevention, advocacy and confidentiality, training, and climate surveys.

Read the statement.

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

Read full report.

Download June 12, 2014 Webinar Powerpoint Slides

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