This series of four guides was originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking. The guides have since been adapted for use by other grantees and organizations that provide programs for victims of any type of crime.

The guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

 

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.

If your program intends to conduct a needs assessment or program evaluation, you must be aware of federal regulations that protect the privacy and confidentiality of persons involved in research (i.e., human subjects). This guide provides basic information about these federal regulations and explains how they pertain to your needs assessment or program evaluation.

Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

The other three guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
 

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.
This following guide will help you:

    * Develop an evaluation plan for collecting data on performance measures.
    * Establish measureable goals and objectives.
    * Design and conduct the program evaluation to continuously assess your program’s progress in achieving its established goals and objectives.
    * Identify measures to reflect the impact of your program’s activities.
    * Use the results to refine and improve services.
Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation

The other three guides include: 
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

This 20th annual World Report summarizes human rights conditions in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide. It reflects extensive investigative work undertaken in 2009 by Human Rights Watch staff, usually in close partnership with human rights activists in the country in question.

World Report 2010

 

Violence and abuse occur in all age groups, at all socioeconomic levels, and throughout all of society’s structure. This paper reviews a sampling of the literature that supports the contention that violence and abuse lead to a significant increase in health care utilization and costs. Includes a graph that illustrates the conditions and health risk behaviors that are known or suspected to have a correlation with lifetime exposure to abuse.

Hidden Costs in Health Care: The Economic Impact of Violence and Abuse

Presents data from the 2008-09 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 195 juvenile confinement facilities between June 2008 and April 2009, with a sample of over 9,000 adjudicated youth. The report provides national-level and facility-level estimates of sexual victimization by type of activity, including youth-on-youth sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also includes an analysis of the experience of sexual victimization, characteristics of youth most at risk to victimization, where the incidents occur, time of day, characteristics of perpetrators, and nature of the injuries. Finally, it includes estimates of the sampling error for selected measures of sexual victimization and summary characteristics of victims and incidents.

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09

Research on juvenile sex offenders goes back more than half a century; however, little information about these young offenders and their offenses exists. This Bulletin draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide population-based epidemiological information on juvenile sex offending.

It is OJJDP’s hope that the findings reported in this Bulletin and their implications will help inform the policy and practice of those committed to addressing the sexual victimization of youth and strengthening its preven-tion and deterrence—considerations that are critical to success.

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors
 
 

The majority of teens have been involved in a romantic relationship. The following  brief, Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships, summarizes findings from focus groups that explored what teens themselves have to say about these relationships.  
 
Among the findings:- Teens view respect, trust, and love as essential to healthy relationships.- Teens have a clear understanding and expectation of what defines a healthy romantic relationship.- Teens' relationships typically fall short of their own standards of healthy romantic relationships.- Infidelity, relationship violence, and few role models contribute to teens' low expectations for healthy relationships. Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships

This report includes a summary of Department of Defense (DoD) policies and programs associated with sexual assault and a description of the WGRR 2008 survey content and methodology. In addition, the report includes an analysis of the prevalence of Reserve component members’ experiences of unwanted sexual contact, sexual harassment, and sex discrimination in the Reserve components in the twelve months prior to taking the survey and the details of incidents they have experienced. The report also includes an analysis of the effectiveness of DoD and Reserve component policies and training on sexual assault and sexual harassment and an assessment of progress related to these issues in the military and in the nation.

2008 Gender Relations Survey of Reserve Component Members

This paper explores how youth and violence have been framed in the media, how the issue of race complicates depictions of youth and violence, and how public attitudes about government can inhibit public support for strategies to effectively prevent violence. Commissioned by UNITY/Prevention Institute and written by the Berkeley Media Studies Group, this paper makes recommendations for the next steps in reframing violence among youth.
Moving From Them to Us: Challenges in Reframing Violence Among Youth

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