In April 2007, WHO held an expert meeting on preventing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. WHO produced a background paper for the meeting. The paper explores what can be done to prevent violence against adolescent and adult women that occurs within intimate relationships, and sexual violence that occurs outside intimate relationships.

In a public health framework, primary prevention means reducing the number of new instances of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence by intervening before any violence occurs. Program and research in primary prevention has lagged efforts in secondary and tertiary prevention, which focus on people who are at risk or already have suffered violence. This background paper helps to close that gap and is the basis for a guideline on intimate partner and sexual violence prevention currently being prepared by WHO, CDC, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Primary prevention of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence: Background paper for WHO expert meeting May 2–3, 2007

Targeted towards development assistance agencies, United Nations organizations, governments and nongovernmental organizations, the document highlights how the health, psycho-social, and economic consequences of violence impede development.

It identifies the gaps - and the many strengths - in current development agency violence prevention priorities and proposes a strengthened agenda for more effective violence prevention. It also puts forward concrete proposals to build up the institutional foundations necessary for violence prevention at both national and international levels.

Preventing violence and reducing its impact: how development agencies can help

This VAWnet Applied Research paper examines both single- and mixed-gender rape prevention and risk reduction programs, and provides suggestions for practitioners to design, implement, and evaluate programs.

Rape Prevention and Risk Reduction: Review of the Research Literature for Practitioners

This research summary is based on a desk review on women’s responses to sexual violence and the appropriateness and effectiveness of sexual violence services in meeting their needs as survivors. The review examines the societal factors that influence rates of sexual violence, women’s immediate and long term responses to such violence, including a range of health related harms, and the interventions and treatments developed to respond to the needs of survivors of sexual violence and reduce its prevalence.
Rape: How women, the community and the health sector respond

This page provides an overview of the CDC’s Rape Prevention and Education Grant
program and also features grantee profiles.

Rape Prevention and Education Grant Program Profiles

This report presents information on the consequences of rape and sexual assault for female victims. The study provides the percentages of completed rape, attempted rape, and sexual assault of females that were reported to the police in 1992-2000. The report provides the percentage of victims that were injured and treated from a completed rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault. It presents the percentage of those who reported to the police, and the percentage of those victims who received treatment and whose victimization was reported to the police.

This report explains the laws enacted in different states to afford victims of crime privileged communication with their counselor.
 
Privacy of Victims’ Counseling Communications

The law “provides for the analysis of the incidents and effects of prison rape in Federal, State, and local institutions and provides information, resources, recommendations, and funding to protect individuals from prison rape.

Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003

This issue of the Research and Advocacy Digest provides an overview of some of the research that exists on the topic of prisoner rape.

Prison Rape and Sexual Coercion Behind Bars

In April 2007, WHO held an expert meeting on preventing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. WHO produced a background paper for the meeting. The paper explores what can be done to prevent violence against adolescent and adult women that occurs within intimate relationships, and sexual violence that occurs outside intimate relationships.

In a public health framework, primary prevention means reducing the number of new instances of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence by intervening before any violence occurs. Program and research in primary prevention has lagged efforts in secondary and tertiary prevention, which focus on people who are at risk or already have suffered violence. This background paper helps to close that gap and is the basis for a guideline on intimate partner and sexual violence prevention currently being prepared by WHO, CDC, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

 Primary prevention of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence: Background paper for WHO expert meeting May 2–3, 2007

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