The 2014 Spring & Summer edition of The Resource features a cover story on campus sexual assault written by the Clery Center For Security On Campus. The article provides details on recent amendments to the Jeanne Cleary Act and how policy can be used to help protect the well-being of students. In the same vein, The University of Oregon has students talking about consent with its SexPositive cellphone app, which has been downloaded more than 10,000 times.

Other topics covered in this issue include the 20th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, how to protect victims’ privacy when electronic evidence is introduced, and a reflection on three years of healthy sexuality as the theme of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

Does taking a sabbatical sound like a good idea? Read about one executive director’s three-month getaway . Looking for a creative way to fundraise? Check out a vanity license plate campaign from Virginia that has been raising money to prevent sexual and domestic violence.

Learn about sexual assault prevention efforts in Pennsylvania, New York, and New Hampshire. See snapshots from Love146’s Sweet Relief Benefit Bakeoff, an event that combined treats and information about fighting human trafficking on Valentine’s Day.

The purpose of this guide is to assist physicians, nurses, and other clinical health care providers in meeting their professional obligations in identifying and providing intervention and treatment to older victims of sexual violence. It includes introductory information, such as definitions and a problem statement, as well as scenarios. Additionally, it discusses issues relevant to health care providers, such as practice recommendations, provider responsibilities, gathering patient history, examination, and evidence collection.

The 2013 Spring/Summer edition of Resource-Cover-Spring-Summer-2013The Resource offers articles and insights on current events and topics such as the Steubenville rape trial, the NO MORE campaign, 1in6’s 1BlueString Campaign, tips for sustaining activism and new findings from a national needs assessment on how to engage Spanish-speaking communities. It also highlights great work happening across the movement, from how to engage faculty to prevent sexual violence on campus to what’s the latest technologies being used by help spread the word.

This Applied Research paper examines whether organizational affiliation and structure affect the quantity and quality of sexual assault services. The paper offers recommendations for future research evaluating the effectiveness of rape crisis centers.

The Effectiveness of Sexual Assault Services in Multi-Service Agencies

Esta traducción resume los principales hallazgos del estudio “La victimización de Violencia Sexual y de las asociaciones de la salud en una muestra de la comunidad de las mujeres hispanas,” realizado por K. C. Basile, S.G. Smith, M.L. Walters, D.N. Fowler, K. Hawk y M.E. Hamburger. Los hallazgos del estudio se basan en nuestra comprensión de los efectos de la violencia sexual en mujeres latinas y pueden orientar nuestras estrategias tanto de prevención de la violencia sexual como de respuesta a ésta.

En inglés.

Sexual violence can result in many health, economic, and social struggles in the lives of survivors. This resource highlights findings from a 2015 study on sexual violence against Latina women. Findings can help strengthen our prevention and response strategies with Latin@ communities. In
Spanish.

These slides were created to support the June 2015 Online xCHANGE Forum: Sexual violence in the lives of African American Women.  This forum will explore current research on the sexual victimization of African American women and future needs for the field.

View the entire slideshow.

View slides by forum topic:

Historical Overview

National Studies

Risk Factors

Characteristics

Physical and Mental Health Consequences

Culturally Sensitive Treatment

View the entire archive of the xCHANGE Forum.

This practitioner focused report of findings from a national research project on Sexual Assault Response Team functioning and effectiveness.

The full version of the technical research report to the National Institute of Justice is available online.
Scientific publications of the data in peer-reviewed journals with full methodological details are also available.

In early 2014, the Department of Defense (DoD) asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military. The resulting study, the RAND Military Workplace Study (RMWS), invited close to 560,000 active- and reserve-component service members to participate in a survey fielded in August and September of 2014, making it one of the largest surveys of its kind ever conducted for DoD. More than 170,000 service members completed the survey. Compared with prior DoD studies, the RMWS takes a new approach to counting individuals in the military who experienced sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the past year.

The RMWS provides DoD with unprecedented detail on the frequency of criminal sexual assault against its members, the nature and context of those assaults, and how they differ for men and women in each branch of service. The study also provides new evidence on the prevalence and nature of sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the military. Detailed results, including recommendations, are documented in four comprehensive volumes (available at www.rand.org/surveys/rmws.html); some of the study's major conclusions about the experiences of DoD service members are highlighted in this brief.

Cover of the PDF version of Five Things Things About Sexual Assault Kits

 

This fact sheet from the National Insitute of Justice outlines what research has told us about sexual assault kits:

1. No one knows the number of kits nationwide that have not been submitted for testing.
2. Little is known about the age of unsubmitted kits.
3. Submitting a kit to a crime lab does not mean the lab will obtain usable DNA.
4. Even if the police have a suspect, testing a kit can be useful for a number of reasons.
5. The cost to test a sexual assault kit varies widely.

 


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