This article is the second part of the new Allicance journal, Revolution. In this part of the journal, Melissa A. DeDomenico-Payne shares her own perspective and experiences within working at sexual assault programs, domestic violence programs and dual programs. The purpose of the article is to be able to make others in the field aware of some of the similarities and differences that exist among stand-alone and dual programs.

 

My Perspective: The Subtle Differences Between...a Stand-Alone Domestic Violence (DV) Program, a Stand-Alone Sexual Assault (SA) Program, and a Dual (DV & SA) Program

The NISVS Fact Sheet provides a brief overview of the data from a national study conducted to assess the impact of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. It discusses the scope of these forms of violence; immediate impacts of victimization; and the lifelong heath consequences experienced by victims of these forms of violence. This information may help to inform policies on prevention and response efforts in the field. Other resources related to this Fact Sheet include the full Summary Report and a Toolkit.

View additional resources on the NISVS website.

 The NISVS Toolkit is a collection of information on developing a communications plan regarding the data from NISVS, a national study conducted to assess the impact of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. It discusses the scope of these forms of violence; immediate impacts of victimization; and the lifelong heath consequences experienced by victims of these forms of violence. The toolkit provides information on the survey methodology, best ways to interpret and use the data, tips for working with media, and answers to frequently asked questions. Other resources related to this Toolkit include the full Summary Report and a Fact Sheet.

 
View additional resources on the NISVS website.

 

This fact sheet provides an overview of key U.S. national research studies currently available on sexual violence with specific attention the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).

This report summarizes the information gathered by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) via a web-based survey regarding how local, state, territory and tribal communities have developed Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs). The survey is a follow-up to the national needs assessment conducted in 2005 by NSVRC.

The goal of this resource is to provide clear, consistent and straightforward guidance on the essential minimum, core content for sexuality education that is age-appropriate for students in grades K–12. The Standards are presented both by topic area and by grade level.

Safe, affordable housing is not only a basic human right and need; safe, affordable housing is a critical component of the healing process for sexual violence victims and survivors. Too many victims and survivors lose their housing as a result of sexual violence or find themselves trapped in homes where they have to endure further sexual victimization because there are no other affordable, safe options. When public policies and practices are informed by the housing needs of sexual violence victims and survivors, society can do much to alleviate the burden of sexual violence not only on individual victims and survivors, but on larger communities. This report provides a summary of key findings from a national survey of advocates on housing and sexual violence.

This report is a part of the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. The packet also includes: an overview; a fact sheet; a research brief; an online resource collection; a technical assistance bulletin; and an advocate's guide to housing and sexual violence.

 

On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

This report offers evidence to demonstrate that incarcerating kids doesn't work: Youth prisons do not reduce future offending, they waste taxpayer dollars, and they frequently expose youth to dangerous and abusive conditions. The report also shows that many states have substantially reduced their juvenile correctional facility populations in recent years, and it finds that these states have seen no resulting increase in juvenile crime or violence. Finally, the report highlights successful reform efforts from several states and provides recommendations for how states can reduce juvenile incarceration rates and redesign their juvenile correction systems to better serve young people and the public.

View this report and related links.

This report provides information about the sexual abuse of immigrants while in detention centers in the United States.
 
No Refuge Here: A First Look at Sexual Abuse in Immigration Detention

Pages

Subscribe to Research