Did you know there’s a link between sexual violence and housing? Sexual violence can jeopardize a person’s housing. Lack of housing or inadequate shelter can increase the risk for sexual violence. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 10 percent of women and 8 percent men who experienced housing insecurity in the past year had a higher prevalence of intimate partner violence. This infographic explores the intersections between housing and sexual violence. For more information on this topic, download the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. (see references) Housing-infographic-cover

INFOGRAPHIC REFERENCES
Housing insecurity and intimate partner violence
Breiding, M. J., Chen J., & Black, M. C. (2014). Intimate partner violence in the United States — 2010. Retrieved from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/cdc_nisvs_ipv_report_2013_v17_...

Assaults in the home
Colombino, N., Mercado, C. C., & Jeglic, E. L. (2009). Situational aspects of sexual offending: Implications for residence restriction laws. Justice
Research and Policy, 11, 27-43. doi:10.3818/JRP.11.2009.27

Youth leaving home
Cray, A., Miller, K., & Durso, L. E. (2013). Seeking shelter: The experiences and unmet needs of LGBT homeless youth. Retrieved from the Center
for American Progress: http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/LGBTHomelessY...

Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania: http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

Victims relocating
Keeley, T. (2006). Landlord sexual assault and rape of tenants: Survey findings and advocacy approaches. Clearinghouse Review: Journal of
Poverty Law and Policy, 40 (7-8), 441-450.

Witnessing an assault
Kipke, M., Simon, T., Montgomery, S., Unger, J., & Iverson, E. (1997). Homeless youth and their exposure to and involvement in violence
while living on the streets. Journal of Adolescent Health, 20, 360-367. doi:10.1016/S1054-139X(97)00037-2

Victims of physical or sexual violence
Kushel, M. B., Evans, J. L., Perry, S., Robertson, M. J., & Moss, A.R. (2003). No door to lock: Victimization among homeless and
marginally housed persons. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163, 2492-2499. doi:10.1001/archinte.163.20.2492

Commercial sexual exploitation
Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania. http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

 

On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

This discussion paper explores the use of evidence-based prevention programs and issues with research-translation in these programs. The goal is to create effective community-based programs that can be expanded to use within other communities.

This paper discusses the importance of integrating holistic healing approaches into direct services in order to support survivors. It looks at approaches to community collaboration and funding as well as providing examples from the field and information about a variety of specific holistic healing modalities. The research addendum offers further support for programs and administrators seeking to provide or augment these services.

This report is produced by Department of Defense and various Service branches to help address the crime of sexual assault within the Military. The data provided in such reports serve as the foundation and catalyst for future sexual assault prevention, training, victim care and accountability goals. It is available in 2 parts for download.

View Volume I

View Volume II

Or, you can view earlier reports.

This report presents the results on issues related to sexual assault from the 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members (WGRA 2012). The data provided in this survey describes the prevalence and incidence of sexual assault within the military.

View reports from earlier surveys.

The annual report provides data and analysis on reported cases of sexual harassment and violence involving Academy personnel between .  It also outlines progress made in prevention and response activities.
 
Read previous annual reports
.
 

The report, Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence, represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women - both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector's capacity to respond to violence against women.

 

View the infographic.

 

See the full report.

 

 

The Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA) is committed to promoting evidence-based practices and high quality research. Consistent with professional and scientific opinion in diverse fields, ATSA recognizes randomized clinical trials (RCT’s) as the preferred method of controlling for bias in treatment outcome evaluations. ATSA promotes the use of RCT to distinguish between interventions that decrease the recidivism risk of sexual offenders and those programs that have no effect or are actually harmful.

This policy paper offers a discussion and recommendations for managing the housing needs of sex offenders.

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