This report examines sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization using National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) data from 2011. The report describes the overall prevalence of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization; racial/ethnic variation in prevalence; how types of perpetrators vary by violence type; and the age at which victimization typically begins. For intimate partner violence, the report also examines a range of negative impacts experienced as a result of victimization, including the need for services.

This 2011 data finds that in the United States, an estimated 19.3% of women and 1.7% of men have been raped during their lifetimes; an estimated 1.6% of women reported that they were raped in the 12 months preceding the survey. The case count for men reporting rape in the preceding 12 months was too small to produce a statistically reliable prevalence estimate. An estimated 43.9% of women and 23.4% of men experienced other forms of sexual violence during their lifetimes, including being made to penetrate, sexual coercion, unwanted sexual contact, and noncontact unwanted sexual experiences. The percentages of women and men who experienced these other forms of sexual violence victimization in the 12 months preceding the survey were an estimated 5.5% and 5.1%, respectively.

Read more information about the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

 

 

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) infographic

This study examined the structure and functioning of U.S. SARTs, patterns of SART implementation and how these patterns relate to SARTs perceived effectiveness at improving victim and legal outcomes.

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

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On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

This research brief is for advocates and preventionists to use in their work to create, implement, and improve bystander intervention programming in their communities. The research reviewed in this brief provides insight into the mobilization of bystander behavior. Each study includes an application section, which provides advocates and preventionists information about how they can use this study in their work.

This reserach brief is a part of the Engaging Bystanders to Prevent Sexual Violence Information Packet.  View the full packet, or other publications included in this packet.

This policy paper discusses implementing randomized clinical trials including the following six considerations; clear rationale for use of randomization, well-defined treatment and comparison intervention conditions, group equivalence, program evaluation/treatment outcome, participant attrition and data analysis.

The goal of this document is to provide relevant information for reducing sexual reoffending by adolescents and promoting effective interventions that facilitate pro-social and law-abiding behaviors. This document is purposefully short in length, summarizes central findings from the research, and outlines some major areas for consideration when working with this population of youth and their families.

Brief-CoverThe purpose of this research brief is to highlight the relationship between sexual violence and the workplace, and examine gaps in existing research.  This rearch brief will allow advocates to connect the research on sexual violence and the workplace to their work with the clients they serve.

This research brief is part of the Sexual Violence and the Workplace information packet.  View the full packet, or other publications included in this packet.

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