The April 2011 issue of the Justice Resource Update newsletter includes information on addressing youth violence, sexual assault kit researchers, information and resources for Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs), and information the prevalence of violence in the workplace.

This publication is provided as a starting point for professional organizations and educational institutions to prepare their helping professionals, including doctors, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and beyond, to develop the skills and competencies needed to meet the needs of individuals who may have experienced abuse and violence.

This toolkit is a collection of resources that victim service professional s may use to formalize, expand on, or evaluate their interagency responses to sexual assault. The toolkit includes five main sections:

  • Learn About SARTs briefly reviews the basics: definitions and statistics related to sexual assault, the common makeup of SARTs and the reasons behind setting them up, and a brief historical outline of SART development since the 1970s.
  • Develop a SART lays out the steps involved in putting together your SART. You'll learn how to build your team; collect data about your jurisdiction to help you create a relevant victim response; develop a strategic plan outlining your goals, objectives, and protocol; determine communication standards for your team (e.g., ethical communication, confidentiality); hold effective meetings; monitor and evaluate your victim response; and sustain your SART. This section also includes detailed information about common SART members—describing their roles and responsibilities—and highlights several critical issues related to sexual assault that every SART should know.
  • Put the Focus on Victims describes how victims may be feeling, approaches to responding to various victims, and ways to help victims heal.
  • Follow Innovative Practiceshighlights SART programs from around the country. See what other jurisdictions are doing before setting up or revamping your SART. Programs cover the fields of advocacy, law enforcement, health care, prosecution, and forensics and deal with multidisciplinary issues and culturally specific practices.
  • Find Tools includes sample resources for specific SART members and tools to use when developing your team and evaluating its activities. Find examples of surveys, forms, brochures, guidelines, legislation, memorandums of understanding, and other resources.

 

 

This Special Collection includes selected materials and resources -- many gender-informed -- that can be used by domestic and sexual violence organizations to increase their preparedness for and response to major disasters and emergencies.

Developments in the field in regards to different reporting options for sexual assault survivors and changing social expectations have made law enforcement agencies reconsider and refine their processes for working with victims of sexual violence. This article explores the major changes in policies and procedures. 
Options for Reporting Sexual Violence: Developments over the Past Decade
 
See also NSVRC Newsletter article interview with Sabrina Garcia from 2001 on this topic. 
 
End Violence Againt Women (EVAW) International offers free training and technical assistance regarding anonymous reporting.  Template materials can be downloaded and adapted to fit your community. 
 
 
 
 

This handbook was developed by the Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force. It is designed to assist SARTs in varying degrees of development. It provides recommended practices for responders, information on victim-centered and offender-focused response, as well as sample protocols, policies and resources in Oregon.

This guide examines the use of polygraph tests and other truth-telling devices (sometimes called “lie-detector tests”) in sexual assault investigations. It is meant to support the Violence Against Women Act and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (VAWA 2005) provision that truth-telling devices must not be used with sexual assault victims as a condition of charging or prosecution of an offense. This guide examines special issues relevant to using truth-telling devices with sexual assault victims. Legislative and judicial actions that have been taken as a result of this debate will also be discussed. Victim advocates, law enforcement officers, and policy makers may use this guide to develop policies, practices, and procedures and to improve collaborations regarding the use of truth-telling devices as the VAWA 2005 provision is adopted across the United States. 

These guidelines provide a comprehensive set of recommended practices for multidisciplinary teams responding to sex crimes. It also includes course outline for Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners.
Sexual Assault Response Team Guidelines

This manual provides recommendations for law enforcement, medical, advocacy and forensic science professionals on the identification, collection and preservation of physical evidence and the minimization of trauma to victim/survivors of sexual assault.
Texas Evidence Collection Manual

This manual provides extensive standards of practice for members of interdisciplinary sexual assault response teams.

San Diego County Sexual Assault Response Team Standards of Practice

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