This report summarizes the information gathered by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) via a web-based survey regarding how local, state, territory and tribal communities have developed Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs). The survey is a follow-up to the national needs assessment conducted in 2005 by NSVRC.

Developments in the field in regards to different reporting options for sexual assault survivors and changing social expectations have made law enforcement agencies reconsider and refine their processes for working with victims of sexual violence. This article explores the major changes in policies and procedures. 
Options for Reporting Sexual Violence: Developments over the Past Decade
 
See also NSVRC Newsletter article interview with Sabrina Garcia from 2001 on this topic. 
 
End Violence Againt Women (EVAW) International offers free training and technical assistance regarding anonymous reporting.  Template materials can be downloaded and adapted to fit your community. 
 
 
 
 

This report includes findings from a national needs assessment that was conducted in 2005 with support from the Office for Victims of Crime. The goals of the survey were to (1) record the organization and administration of Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) nationally as an introductory “portrait” of collaborative responses and (2) collect data about SART training and technical assistance needs for inclusion in a forthcoming National SART Toolkit.

This report includes findings from a national needs assessment that was conducted in 2005 with support from the Office for Victims of Crime. The goals of the survey were to (1) record the organization and administration of Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) nationally as an introductory “portrait” of collaborative responses and (2) collect data about SART training and technical assistance needs for inclusion in a forthcoming National SART Toolkit.

This guide provides information that will help in responding to transgender survivors of sexual assault in a way that is helpful, informed, and supportive.

Access the guide.

This manual provides extensive standards of practice for members of interdisciplinary sexual assault response teams.

San Diego County Sexual Assault Response Team Standards of Practice

This brief assessment tool provides communities with the opportunity to explore community readiness for sexual assault response team development regarding perceptions, resources and services. 

This toolkit is a collection of resources that victim service professional s may use to formalize, expand on, or evaluate their interagency responses to sexual assault. The toolkit includes five main sections:

  • Learn About SARTs briefly reviews the basics: definitions and statistics related to sexual assault, the common makeup of SARTs and the reasons behind setting them up, and a brief historical outline of SART development since the 1970s.
  • Develop a SART lays out the steps involved in putting together your SART. You'll learn how to build your team; collect data about your jurisdiction to help you create a relevant victim response; develop a strategic plan outlining your goals, objectives, and protocol; determine communication standards for your team (e.g., ethical communication, confidentiality); hold effective meetings; monitor and evaluate your victim response; and sustain your SART. This section also includes detailed information about common SART members—describing their roles and responsibilities—and highlights several critical issues related to sexual assault that every SART should know.
  • Put the Focus on Victims describes how victims may be feeling, approaches to responding to various victims, and ways to help victims heal.
  • Follow Innovative Practiceshighlights SART programs from around the country. See what other jurisdictions are doing before setting up or revamping your SART. Programs cover the fields of advocacy, law enforcement, health care, prosecution, and forensics and deal with multidisciplinary issues and culturally specific practices.
  • Find Tools includes sample resources for specific SART members and tools to use when developing your team and evaluating its activities. Find examples of surveys, forms, brochures, guidelines, legislation, memorandums of understanding, and other resources.

 

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

Read full report.

Download June 12, 2014 Webinar Powerpoint Slides

Read related policy briefs:

 

 

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