This article provides reflections on the work of the Division of Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention by bringing the issue to sexual violence into the public health forum. These efforts have moved sexual violence prevention work forward over the past decade.

Read the article.

This paper explores how youth and violence have been framed in the media, how the issue of race complicates depictions of youth and violence, and how public attitudes about government can inhibit public support for strategies to effectively prevent violence. Commissioned by UNITY/Prevention Institute and written by the Berkeley Media Studies Group, this paper makes recommendations for the next steps in reframing violence among youth.
Moving From Them to Us: Challenges in Reframing Violence Among Youth

On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

This issue of Partners in Social Change is intended to provide an overview of public health theory that is relevant for anti-rape advocates, and to provide the inspriration and desire to engage in the collaborative effort.
 
Partners in Social Change: Public Health Theory

The NSVRC in collaboration with the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence, the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, and International Association of Forensic Nurses have developed this joint statement recommending that systems be established to ensure that survivors of sexual assault have universal access to medications to prevent HIV following rape.

Read full statement

Read the press release.

Sign on to Support. 

Additional Resources.

This document aims to provide information for policy-makers and planners to develop data-driven and evidence-based programmes for preventing intimate partner and sexual violence against women.

A quick and fun breakdown of steps to take to incorporate the prevention of sexual violence into your community, program, or partnerships.

Access the Prevention Recipe Card online

In April 2007, WHO held an expert meeting on preventing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. WHO produced a background paper for the meeting. The paper explores what can be done to prevent violence against adolescent and adult women that occurs within intimate relationships, and sexual violence that occurs outside intimate relationships.

In a public health framework, primary prevention means reducing the number of new instances of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence by intervening before any violence occurs. Program and research in primary prevention has lagged efforts in secondary and tertiary prevention, which focus on people who are at risk or already have suffered violence. This background paper helps to close that gap and is the basis for a guideline on intimate partner and sexual violence prevention currently being prepared by WHO, CDC, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

 Primary prevention of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence: Background paper for WHO expert meeting May 2–3, 2007

This 4 page fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. National Rape Prevention and Education Program (RPE) including information on purpose, scope and impact. 

 
This report presents baseline information on pregnancies, births, sexual history and behavior, contraceptive use, non-voluntary sex, and unintended pregnancy among urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women nationwide.

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