The NISVS Toolkit is a collection of information on developing a communications plan regarding the data from NISVS, a national study conducted to assess the impact of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. It discusses the scope of these forms of violence; immediate impacts of victimization; and the lifelong heath consequences experienced by victims of these forms of violence. The toolkit provides information on the survey methodology, best ways to interpret and use the data, tips for working with media, and answers to frequently asked questions. Other resources related to this Toolkit include the full Summary Report and a Fact Sheet.

 
View additional resources on the NISVS website.

 

This report provides information on very young offenders (between the ages of 7 and 12) who become involved with the juvenile justice system.
 
Prevalence and Development of Child Delinquency

This report presents information on the consequences of rape and sexual assault for female victims. The study provides the percentages of completed rape, attempted rape, and sexual assault of females that were reported to the police in 1992-2000. The report provides the percentage of victims that were injured and treated from a completed rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault. It presents the percentage of those who reported to the police, and the percentage of those victims who received treatment and whose victimization was reported to the police.

This report presents findings from the National Incident-Based Reporting System regarding sexual assault of young children. The data are based on reports from law enforcement agencies of 12 States and covers the years 1991 through 1996. The report presents sexual assault in 4 categories: forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling. Findings include statistics on the incidence of sexual assault, the victims, their offenders, gender, response to these crimes, locality, time of incident, the levels of victim injury, victims' perceptions of offenders' ages, and victim-offender relationships, and other detailed characteristics.
Sexual Assault of Young Children as Reported to Law Enforcement: Victim, Incident, and Offender Characteristics

Presents data from the 2008-09 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 195 juvenile confinement facilities between June 2008 and April 2009, with a sample of over 9,000 adjudicated youth. The report provides national-level and facility-level estimates of sexual victimization by type of activity, including youth-on-youth sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also includes an analysis of the experience of sexual victimization, characteristics of youth most at risk to victimization, where the incidents occur, time of day, characteristics of perpetrators, and nature of the injuries. Finally, it includes estimates of the sampling error for selected measures of sexual victimization and summary characteristics of victims and incidents.

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09

Presents data from the 2012 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 326 juvenile confinement facilities between February and September 2012, with a sample of 8,707 adjudicated youth. The report ranks facilities according to the prevalence of sexual victimization, as required under the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-79). The prevalence of victimization, as reported by youth during a personal interview, is based on sexual activity in the 12 months prior to the interview or since admission to the facility, if less than 12 months. This report provides state- and national-level estimates of juvenile sexual victimization by type of activity, including estimates of youth-on-youth nonconsensual sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also explores sexual victimization by the characteristics of both the perpetrator and youth at high risk of victimization, location and time of incidents, and nature of the relationship between youth and facility staff prior to sexual contact.

This Bureau of Justice Statistics report includes results from the second  National Inmate Survey (NIS-2) which includes data from 167 state and federal prisons, 286 jails, and 10 special confinement facilities operated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the U.S. Military, and correctional authorities in Indian country. It was administered to 81,566 inmates ages 18 or older. The report includes information on prevalence, circumstances surrounding victimization, facility rankings and variations based on gender, race, educational background, sexual orientation and previous sexual victimization.  4.4% of prison inmates and 3.1% of jail inmates reported one or more incidents of sexual victimization.

This study documents that sexual violence against female children is a substantial problem in Swaziland and that such violence has serious health consequences. In a self reporting survey of 1900 households, one in three females reported that they had experienced some form of sexual violence as a child. But this study is more than a prevalence study. It also describes and documents many of the circumstances and conditions under which sexual violence tends to occur. These patterns provide important information about how to target and organize prevention strategies and policies.

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Sexual violence and its health consequences for female children in Swaziland: a cluster survey study

These talking points are taken from the NSVRC publication “Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates.” This resource highlights what is happening in the military, the aftermath of sexual violence, and prevention developments. See the guide for more in-depth information.

The majority of teens have been involved in a romantic relationship. The following  brief, Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships, summarizes findings from focus groups that explored what teens themselves have to say about these relationships.  
 
Among the findings:- Teens view respect, trust, and love as essential to healthy relationships.- Teens have a clear understanding and expectation of what defines a healthy romantic relationship.- Teens' relationships typically fall short of their own standards of healthy romantic relationships.- Infidelity, relationship violence, and few role models contribute to teens' low expectations for healthy relationships. Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships

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