This infographic is a visual snapshot of some of the statistics included in the NSVRC publication “Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates.” See the guide for more in-depth information. 

The 2014 Fall & Winter edition of The Resource celebrates the 20th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act.

Vice President Joe Biden recently deemed VAWA his “proudest legislative achievement.” In an article inside this issue, a legal advocate gives an inside look at what it was like to work on the second iteration of the landmark legislation in 1998.

Other topics covered in this issue include:

Primary prevention: It’s for everyone, so how can we make getting started more accessible?

Community Voices: We asked members of the anti-sexual violence movement to tell us their favorite ways to practice self-care.

Racism: Becoming an anti-racist organization is a process; let’s begin.

Evaluation: It’s important to evaluate our prevention work. But how can we do that effectively?

There’s even more inside! Want to read about a topic we haven’t covered? Send your idea to resources@nsvrc.org. Thanks for reading.

This guide focuses on adapting advocacy skills to help young people who experience homelessness and sexual violence build resiliency and lessen their traumas. It has three aims: (a) to provide an overview for the intersections between identity, trauma experiences, and resiliency among youth who are homeless; (b) to highlight core skills and techniques for advocates; and (c) to discuss how to tailor these skills in order to improve services for youth who identify as LGBTQ.

Also available is an infographic, Homeless Youth & Sexual Violence, which illustrates statistics that show the link between youth homelessness and sexual violence.

For more about the topic of homelessness, access the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet and the Link Between Housing & Sexual Violence infographic.

 

Stop Street Harassment released this national report discussing research into the prevalence and experience of street harassment by both women and men. The majority of women experience street harassment. Many men who experience street harassment in the form of homophobic or transphobic slurs.

Access the Full Report, Executive Summary, and Press Release.

Did you know there’s a link between sexual violence and housing? Sexual violence can jeopardize a person’s housing. Lack of housing or inadequate shelter can increase the risk for sexual violence. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 10 percent of women and 8 percent men who experienced housing insecurity in the past year had a higher prevalence of intimate partner violence. This infographic explores the intersections between housing and sexual violence. For more information on this topic, download the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. (see references) Housing-infographic-cover

INFOGRAPHIC REFERENCES
Housing insecurity and intimate partner violence
Breiding, M. J., Chen J., & Black, M. C. (2014). Intimate partner violence in the United States — 2010. Retrieved from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/cdc_nisvs_ipv_report_2013_v17_...

Assaults in the home
Colombino, N., Mercado, C. C., & Jeglic, E. L. (2009). Situational aspects of sexual offending: Implications for residence restriction laws. Justice
Research and Policy, 11, 27-43. doi:10.3818/JRP.11.2009.27

Youth leaving home
Cray, A., Miller, K., & Durso, L. E. (2013). Seeking shelter: The experiences and unmet needs of LGBT homeless youth. Retrieved from the Center
for American Progress: http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/LGBTHomelessY...

Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania: http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

Victims relocating
Keeley, T. (2006). Landlord sexual assault and rape of tenants: Survey findings and advocacy approaches. Clearinghouse Review: Journal of
Poverty Law and Policy, 40 (7-8), 441-450.

Witnessing an assault
Kipke, M., Simon, T., Montgomery, S., Unger, J., & Iverson, E. (1997). Homeless youth and their exposure to and involvement in violence
while living on the streets. Journal of Adolescent Health, 20, 360-367. doi:10.1016/S1054-139X(97)00037-2

Victims of physical or sexual violence
Kushel, M. B., Evans, J. L., Perry, S., Robertson, M. J., & Moss, A.R. (2003). No door to lock: Victimization among homeless and
marginally housed persons. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163, 2492-2499. doi:10.1001/archinte.163.20.2492

Commercial sexual exploitation
Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania. http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

 

This fact sheet studies children's exposure to sexually explicit material and sexual exploitation. Also see the fact sheet on the Impact of Media and Technology on Youth.

Information for this fact sheet is drawn from the National Plan to Prevent the Sexual Exploitation of Children.

This fact sheet provides data on youth and technology, Internet activities, mobile media, and games. Also see the fact sheet on the Impact of Exposure to Sexually Explicit and Exploitive Materials.

Information for this fact sheet is drawn from the National Plan to Prevent the Sexual Exploitation of Children.

These talking points are taken from the NSVRC publication “Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates.” This resource highlights what is happening in the military, the aftermath of sexual violence, and prevention developments. See the guide for more in-depth information.

Presents data from the 2012 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 326 juvenile confinement facilities between February and September 2012, with a sample of 8,707 adjudicated youth. The report ranks facilities according to the prevalence of sexual victimization, as required under the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-79). The prevalence of victimization, as reported by youth during a personal interview, is based on sexual activity in the 12 months prior to the interview or since admission to the facility, if less than 12 months. This report provides state- and national-level estimates of juvenile sexual victimization by type of activity, including estimates of youth-on-youth nonconsensual sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also explores sexual victimization by the characteristics of both the perpetrator and youth at high risk of victimization, location and time of incidents, and nature of the relationship between youth and facility staff prior to sexual contact.

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet presents some basic statistics on sexual violence and its prevalence.

 

The full media packet offers six resources will answer common questions related to sexual violence.

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