This guide focuses on the impact of sexual violence in the military. It includes resources for advocates who, through relationships and collaborations with the military, can offer support in responding to the needs of survivors and preventing sexual violence.

The following documents are available: "Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates," an infographic, and talking points.

This infographic is a visual snapshot of some of the statistics included in the NSVRC publication “Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates.” See the guide for more in-depth information. 

This report includes a summary of Department of Defense (DoD) policies and programs associated with sexual assault and a description of the WGRR 2008 survey content and methodology. In addition, the report includes an analysis of the prevalence of Reserve component members’ experiences of unwanted sexual contact, sexual harassment, and sex discrimination in the Reserve components in the twelve months prior to taking the survey and the details of incidents they have experienced. The report also includes an analysis of the effectiveness of DoD and Reserve component policies and training on sexual assault and sexual harassment and an assessment of progress related to these issues in the military and in the nation.

2008 Gender Relations Survey of Reserve Component Members

This report presents the results on issues related to sexual assault from the 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members (WGRA 2012). The data provided in this survey describes the prevalence and incidence of sexual assault within the military.

View reports from earlier surveys.

The annual report provides data and analysis on reported cases of sexual harassment and violence involving Academy personnel between .  It also outlines progress made in prevention and response activities.
 
Read previous annual reports
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This report is produced by Department of Defense and various Service branches to help address the crime of sexual assault within the Military. The data provided in such reports serve as the foundation and catalyst for future sexual assault prevention, training, victim care and accountability goals. It is available in 2 parts for download.

View Volume I

View Volume II

Or, you can view earlier reports.

Sexual assault within the military continues to occur at alarming levels with 26,000 anonymously reported incidents in 2012 alone according to Department of Defense (DoD) estimates. During this same period, only 3,300 service members reported their assaults. Meanwhile, the nation is confronted with headlines of high level military sexual assault leaders acting in sexually abusive ways. Combined with the heart-wrenching stories of survivors, these facts reveal the depth of the problem of military sexual assault (MSA) and demand incisive action.

This Special Collection addresses sexual violence against military service members, defines Military Sexual Trauma (MST), and offers resources (including information on current policy, procedures, legislation, and litigation) to support the prevention of and response to sexual violence as it impacts service members and veterans in the United States.

These talking points are taken from the NSVRC publication “Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates.” This resource highlights what is happening in the military, the aftermath of sexual violence, and prevention developments. See the guide for more in-depth information.

This report documents persistent sexual violence by the army, and the limited impact of government and donor efforts to address the problem. The report looks closely at the conduct of the army's 14th brigade as an example of the wider problem of sexual violence by soldiers. The brigade has been implicated in many acts of sexual violence in North and South Kivu provinces, often in the context of massive looting and other attacks on civilians. Despite ample information about the situation, military, political, and judicial authorities have failed to take decisive action to prevent rape.
Soldiers Who Rape, Commanders Who Condone: Sexual Violence and Military Reform in the Democratic Republic of Congo
 

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