This publication explores how sexual violence is portrayed in the news and considers the implications of these portrayals for prevention advocates and journalists interested in discussing not just the details of sexual violence, but also how to end it. The findings lay the foundation for ongoing work to define more effective messages about sexual violence that can support prevention policies.

This work is part of a multi-year collaboration between the National Sexual Violence Resource Center and Berkeley Media Studies Group.

The serial perpetration hypothesis — which suggests that a small number of men perpetrate the vast majority of rapes, and that these men perpetrate multiple rapes over time — has played an important role in the field of rape prevention as a model of sexual violence, especially raising awareness of rapists who have not been identified by the criminal justice system. A 2015 study published in JAMA Pediatrics, A Trajectory Analysis of the Campus Serial Rapist Assumption, raises questions about the serial perpetrator hypothesis.

Although it is clear that a subset of perpetrators do commit multiple acts of rape over time, the research suggests that most perpetrators do not chronically offend over time. Instead, perpetrators are much more heterogeneous in terms of their risk factors, methods of coercion, and pattern of offending over time.

 

Esta traducción resume los principales hallazgos del estudio “La victimización de Violencia Sexual y de las asociaciones de la salud en una muestra de la comunidad de las mujeres hispanas,” realizado por K. C. Basile, S.G. Smith, M.L. Walters, D.N. Fowler, K. Hawk y M.E. Hamburger. Los hallazgos del estudio se basan en nuestra comprensión de los efectos de la violencia sexual en mujeres latinas y pueden orientar nuestras estrategias tanto de prevención de la violencia sexual como de respuesta a ésta.

En inglés.

Sexual violence can result in many health, economic, and social struggles in the lives of survivors. This resource highlights findings from a 2015 study on sexual violence against Latina women. Findings can help strengthen our prevention and response strategies with Latin@ communities. In
Spanish.

To contribute to the dissemination of new brain research as it applies to those
serving children and youth, Child Trends invited Jane Roskams, Ph.D., a leading
neuroscientist and executive director of strategy and alliances at the Allen
Institute for Brain Science, to speak. Dr Roskams is a long-standing researcher
in the field of brain repair and epigenetics. She revealed new developments
in our understanding of how the brain grows and learns, and how it adapts
to its environment and trauma. Following her presentation, Dr. Kristin Moore,
Child Trends’ senior scholar and past president, moderated a discussion on the
practical implications of shifting views on brain development and resiliency. The
discussion aimed to inform programs and policies that affect young people,
particularly at-risk children. It featured two repondents: Daniel Cardinali,
President of Communities In Schools, the nation's largest drop-out prevention
program; and Dianna Walters of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative.
This research brief summarizes their presentations.

This practitioner focused report of findings from a national research project on Sexual Assault Response Team functioning and effectiveness.

The full version of the technical research report to the National Institute of Justice is available online.
Scientific publications of the data in peer-reviewed journals with full methodological details are also available.

In early 2014, the Department of Defense (DoD) asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military. The resulting study, the RAND Military Workplace Study (RMWS), invited close to 560,000 active- and reserve-component service members to participate in a survey fielded in August and September of 2014, making it one of the largest surveys of its kind ever conducted for DoD. More than 170,000 service members completed the survey. Compared with prior DoD studies, the RMWS takes a new approach to counting individuals in the military who experienced sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the past year.

The RMWS provides DoD with unprecedented detail on the frequency of criminal sexual assault against its members, the nature and context of those assaults, and how they differ for men and women in each branch of service. The study also provides new evidence on the prevalence and nature of sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the military. Detailed results, including recommendations, are documented in four comprehensive volumes (available at www.rand.org/surveys/rmws.html); some of the study's major conclusions about the experiences of DoD service members are highlighted in this brief.

This report describes research on victim and professional perspectives on the delivery of victim notification procedures, implementation of new victim notification processes, victim engagement within the criminal justice system, and recommendations for improvements.

Victims and professionals made five recommendations.

  • Law enforcement should not assume that a victim does or does not want to be notified.
  • All victims should be given the opportunity to be notified, and the decision for notification should be a choice provided to all victims instead of something imposed on them by someone else.
  • Mechanisms for notification should be flexible and thoughtful and incorporate choices for victims.
  • Victims should have a choice in whether their case moves forward based on DNA testing.
  • Resources and support are imperative to the notification process.

Additional reports from this research project can be found at: www.houstonsakresearch.org.

This Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) in Brief summarizes key points from "Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011." This report presents 2011 data from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) on the ages of first victimization and on the public health burden of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization, as well as the characteristics of victimization. Before implementation of NISVS in 2010, the most recent detailed national data on the public health burden from these forms of violence were obtained from the National Violence against Women Survey conducted during 1995–1996.

Increasingly, preventionists are working to prevent sexual violence at community- and societal-levels. Influencing public policies falls within these realms. This resource provides an overview of the key findings from Exploring alcohol policy approaches to prevent sexual violence perpetration, by Caroline Lippy and Sarah DeGue (2014). Potential prevention strategies are discussed, including policy advocacy to influence the availability and marketing of alcohol and the environment surrounding its consumption; anti-oppression, social justice prevention approaches; and collaborations across disciplines, research, and practice.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Research Briefs